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University Bulletin

Undergraduate Degree Programs

Comparative Literature (CMLIT)

CMLIT 101 (GH;US;IL) Race, Gender, and Identity in World Literature (3) Identity and race, gender and heritage, centrality and marginality, self and other, as expressed in literary works from around the world.

CMLIT 101 The Theme of Identity in World Literatures; Race, Gender, and Other Issues of Diversity (3)
(GH;US;IL)

(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.

This course examines issues of race, gender, religions, and ethnicity as expressed in literary, social, and cultural contexts. We will address these questions in works from a variety of traditions and time periods. Literary works from around the world show a wide range of response to the "other" -- idealization of difference as exotic, fear of difference as threat, the desire to suppress difference or force it into conformity, the recognition of difference within ourselves, etc. The scope includes authors who are themselves members of racial, sexual or ethnic groups with which you may be less familiar. You will also consider the question of who and what constitutes identity as perceived by oneself and by others.

CMLIT 101 is one of the many choices of survey courses, which count towards the Comparative Literature major and the World Literature minor. This course also fulfills the General Education Humanities requirement, the Bachelor of Arts Humanities requirement, and the United States and International Cultures requirement.

In general, this course will be taught in the active-learning mode, featuring in-class discussion, writing projects and web-based activities. Specifically:
-Writing, speaking, self-expression: Students will write essays and/or papers, which require the analysis and comparison of various literary works from the standpoint of identity issues.
-Engagement in collaborative learning and teamwork: Small discussion groups both in-class and on-line will facilitate learning as a group activity. Activities may include group in-class presentations.
-Application of intercultural/international competence: Students will deal with a wide range of texts from around the world and compare/contrast the texts focusing on issues of diversity. This course, by definition, deals directly with issues of inter- and intra-cultural identity.
-Dialogue pertaining to social behavior, community, and scholarly conduct: The discussion of diversity issues is related to students' perception of their own identity and reaction to the notion of the "other." Implicit in this discussion is the issue of "community" creation of the "other" and individual response to the community.


General Education: GH
Diversity: US;IL
Bachelor of Arts: Humanities
Effective: Fall 2010

Note : Class size, frequency of offering, and evaluation methods will vary by location and instructor. For these details check the specific course syllabus.