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University Bulletin
Graduate Degree Programs

Philosophy (PHIL)

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AMY ALLEN, Head, Philosophy
Professor of Philosophy
240 Sparks Building
814-863-3531
ara17@psu.edu

 

Degrees Conferred:

Ph.D., M.A.
Dual-title Ph.D. in African American and Diaspora Studies
Dual-title Ph.D. in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies
Dual-title Ph.D. and M.A. in Women's Studies

 

The Graduate Faculty

 

 

The Programs

Graduate education in the Penn State Department of Philosophy coordinates our longstanding strength in Continental philosophy with our emerging specialties in feminist philosophy and critical philosophy of race.  The graduate program’s signature style of pursuing these strengths involves engagement with and reflection on the history of philosophy.  It also integrates our strengths with the study of ethics richly informed by a historical approach.  We understand Continental philosophy, feminist philosophy, and critical philosophy of race necessarily draw from multiple traditions, including analytic and American as well as Continental philosophy.  Likewise, the field of ethics draws on multiple traditions, and the history of philosophy can be and is pursued by means of different problematics and diverse philosophical traditions.  Graduate students are trained in multiple traditions, helping produce a new generation of diverse students who are philosophically “multilingual.” 

Interdisciplinary study is also possible across the humanities, the social sciences, the arts, the natural sciences, and interdisciplinary programs such as Women's Studies and African American Studies. Doctoral minors are available in social thought and in literary theory, criticism, and aesthetics. Study abroad is possible as well, through exchange programs or individual arrangements with leading departments of philosophy.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. Applicants apply for admission to the program via the Graduate School application for admission.

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), or from a comparable substitute examination accepted by the Philosophy graduate program, are required for admission. At the discretion of the graduate program, a student may be admitted provisionally for graduate study without these scores.

Undergraduate preparation in Philosophy is advisable.

Students with a 3.00 junior/senior grade-point average (on a 4.00 scale) and with appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission. The best-qualified applicants will be accepted up to the number of spaces that are available for new students. Exceptions to the minimum 3.00 GPA may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests at the discretion of the program.

Degree Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to requirements stated in the DEGREE REQUIREMENTS section of the Graduate Bulletin.


M.A. Credit Requirements

Students receive an M.A. degree as a part of their work for the Ph.D.  The M.A. is awarded after successful completion of the candidacy exam, part of which serves as the master’s scholarly paper, and after acquiring the minimum 30 credits of courses.

Students awarded an M.A. will have met the following requirements:

1. A minimum of 30 credits including at least 18 credits in 500 level courses.
               a. At least 18 credits must be in Philosophy.  (At least 12 of these credits must be in 400 and 500 level courses).
               b. 6 credits may be in a Graduate Minor.
2. The submission of a candidacy portfolio, a portion of which serves as the master’s scholarly paper. The portfolio must be accepted by the candidacy committee and the head of the graduate program.
3. Successful completion of the candidacy exam.

The department does not admit applicants for the terminal master's degree.


Ph.D. Credit Requirements

A minimum of 30 credits in residence at Penn State. 18 of these course credits must be at the 500 level in Philosophy. In addition, at least 9 credits must be taken at the 600 level in Philosophy. Candidates typically take 50 credits of course work and 36 research credits. At the program’s discretion, candidates may take up to 15 non-Philosophy credits toward a doctoral minor.

The foreign language requirement for the Philosophy Ph.D. degree is satisfied either by passing department translation examinations in two languages other than English, or by passing one language examination and PHIL 512 Logic.

To earn the Ph.D. degree, doctoral students must also write a dissertation that is accepted by the doctoral committee, the head of the graduate program, and the Graduate School.

Dual-Title Doctoral Degree in Philosophy and African American and Diaspora Studies

Admission Requirements

Students must apply and be admitted to the graduate program in Philosophy and the Graduate School before they can apply for admission to the dual-title degree program. Applicants interested in the dual-title degree program may make their interest known on their applications to Philosophy. Students must apply and be admitted to the dual-title degree program in African American and Diaspora Studies prior to taking the candidacy exam.  In addition to the admission requirements set forth by the Graduate Council and the Department of Philosophy, students will be admitted to the dual-title degree program in African American and Diaspora Studies by an admissions committee of African American and Diaspora Studies faculty.

GPA and GRE Requirements

Applicants entering with only an undergraduate degree should have a junior/senior cumulative average of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale), and, where applicable, a minimum GPA of 3.50 for all graduate work previously undertaken. Exceptions to the minimum GPA requirement may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests at the discretion of the program. Each applicant must provide the scores of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within five years previous to the date of application that have already been provided for admission to the graduate major program.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

To qualify for the dual-title degree in Philosophy and African American and Diaspora Studies, students must satisfy the Philosophy Ph.D. degree requirements listed in the “Degree Requirements” section above.  In addition to the Philosophy Department requirements listed above, the minimum course requirements for this dual-title Ph.D. degree are as follows:

15 credits of course work related to African American and Diaspora Studies, all at the 500 or 800 level. Of these 15 credits, 9 must come from the required core course sequence in African American and Diaspora Studies, which comprises the following courses:

AFAM 501. Seminar in African American Studies (3)
AFAM 502. Blacks and African Diaspora (3)
AFAM 503. Sexual and Gender Politics in the African Diaspora (3)

Students must also take 6 elective credits, all of which must come from the list of approved electives maintained in the African American and Diaspora Studies program office. Penn State allows a maximum of 10 transfer credits of high-quality graduate work to be applied toward the requirements for a graduate degree, subject to restrictions outlined in the Transfer Courses section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Candidacy

In accordance with Graduate Council policy, the candidacy committee must include at least one member of the African American and Diaspora Studies Graduate Faculty. Faculty members who hold appointments in both programs’ graduate faculty may serve in a combined role.

Because students must first be admitted to a graduate major program of study before they may apply to and be considered for admission into a dual-title graduate degree program, dual-title graduate degree students may require an additional semester to fulfill requirements for both areas of study and, therefore, the candidacy examination may be delayed one semester beyond the normal period allowable.

The dual-title field must be fully integrated into the candidacy exam for the doctoral program. In addition, candidates for the dual-title Ph.D. in African American and Diaspora Studies will be required to present to their committee a portfolio of work in African American and Diaspora Studies which includes a statement of the student’s interdisciplinary research interests, a program plan, and samples of writing that indicate the student’s interest in questions taken up by scholars of African American and Diaspora Studies.

Doctoral Committee Composition

In addition to the general Graduate Council requirements for doctoral committees, the doctoral committee of a Philosophy and African American and Diaspora Studies dual-title doctoral degree student must include at least one member of the African American and Diaspora Studies Graduate Faculty. Faculty members who hold appointments in both programs’ Graduate Faculty may serve in a combined role. If the chair of the doctoral committee is not a member of the Graduate Faculty in African American and Diaspora Studies, the member of the committee representing African American and Diaspora Studies must be appointed as co-chair.

Comprehensive Exams

The African American and Diaspora Studies graduate faculty member on the student's committee is responsible for developing and administering the African American and Diaspora Studies portion of the student's comprehensive exams. The exam must incorporate written and oral components in African American and Diaspora Studies based on the student’s thematic or regional area of interest and specialization in African American and Diaspora Studies. The African American and Diaspora Studies portion of the exam will include the following components: broad history of the field, contemporary theory and debates, and either sexual and gender politics or a topic related to the student’s specific area of interest.

Dissertation

The candidate must complete a dissertation and pass a final oral defense of that dissertation on a topic that reflects their original research and education in both Philosophy and African American and Diaspora Studies in order to earn the dual- title Ph.D. degree.  The dissertation must be accepted by the doctoral committee, the head of the graduate program, and the Graduate School.

Dual-Title Doctoral Degree in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Admission Requirements

Students must apply and be admitted to the graduate program in Philosophy and The Graduate School before they can apply for admission to the dual-title degree program. Applicants interested in the dual-title degree program may make their interest known on their applications to Philosophy. Students must apply and be admitted to the dual-title graduate program in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies prior to taking the candidacy exam. In addition to the admission requirements set forth by the Graduate Council and the Department of Philosophy, students seeking admission to the dual-title program will be admitted to graduate study in CAMS by an admissions committee of CAMS faculty and the approval of the head of CAMS.

Applicants to this dual-title degree program should have an academic record that demonstrates expertise in a field relevant to ancient Mediterranean studies and proficiency at an intermediate level (e.g., 3 semesters of study) in one or more ancient languages. Prospective students seeking admission to this dual-title degree program are required to write a statement of purpose that addresses the ways in which their research and professional goals will reflect an interest in interdisciplinary research in the participating program and the disciplines and fields included in CAMS.

GPA and GRE Requirements

Applicants entering with only an undergraduate degree should have a junior/senior cumulative average of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale), and, where applicable, a minimum GPA of 3.50 for all graduate work previously undertaken. Exceptions to the minimum GPA requirement may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests at the discretion of the program. Each applicant must provide the scores of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within five years previous to the date of application that have already been provided for admission to the graduate major program.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

To qualify for the dual-title degree in Philosophy and Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, students must satisfy the Philosophy Ph.D. degree requirements listed in the “Degree Requirements” section above.  In addition to the Philosophy Department requirements listed above, the minimum course requirements for this dual-title Ph.D. degree are as follows:

15 credits of CAMS-related coursework at the 400 or 500 level.

3 of these credits will come from CAMS 592 (Proseminar).  At least 3 credits will come from CAMS 593 (Research Seminar). The remainder may come from CAMS courses or courses relevant to the student's research interests, as approved by the student's doctoral adviser and the CAMS program director of graduate studies. Unless exempted by the student’s graduate supervisory committee, at least 6 of these credits should be in an ancient language.

Language Requirements

In addition to advanced proficiency in one ancient language, students will be expected to acquire and demonstrate reading proficiency in those modern foreign languages (e.g., but not exclusively, French, German, Italian) appropriate to their research interests, as identified by their doctoral committee.

Candidacy

In accordance with Graduate Council policy, the candidacy committee must include at least one member of the Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies Graduate Faculty. Faculty members who hold appointments in both programs’ graduate faculty may serve in a combined role.

Because students must first be admitted to a graduate major program of study before they may apply to and be considered for admission into a dual-title graduate degree program, dual-title graduate degree students may require an additional semester to fulfill requirements for both areas of study and, therefore, the candidacy examination may be delayed one semester beyond the normal period allowable.

The dual-title field must be fully integrated into the candidacy exam for the doctoral program. In addition, candidates for the dual-title Ph.D. in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies will be required to present a portfolio of work in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies which includes a statement of the student's interdisciplinary research interests, a program plan, and samples of writing that indicate the student's work in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies.

Doctoral Committee Composition

In addition to the general Graduate Council requirements for doctoral committees, the doctoral committee of a Philosophy and Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies dual-title doctoral degree student must include at least one member of the Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies Graduate Faculty. Faculty members who hold appointments in both programs’ Graduate Faculty may serve in a combined role. If the chair of the doctoral committee is not a member of the Graduate Faculty in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, the member of the committee representing Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies must be appointed as co-chair.

Comprehensive Exams

The Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies graduate faculty member on the student's committee is responsible for developing and administering the Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies portion of the student's comprehensive exams. The exam must incorporate written and oral components in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies based on the student’s thematic or historical area of interest and specialization in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies.

Dissertation

The candidate must complete a dissertation and pass a final oral examination (the dissertation defense) on a topic that reflects their original research and education in both the primary discipline and Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies in order to earn the dual- title Ph.D. degree.  The dissertation must be accepted by the doctoral committee, the head of the graduate program, and the Graduate School.

Dual-Title Graduate Degree in Philosophy and Women’s Studies

Admission Requirements

Students must apply and be admitted to the graduate program in Philosophy and the Graduate School before they can apply for admission to the dual-title degree program. Applicants interested in the dual-title degree program may make their interest known on their applications to Philosophy. Students must apply and be admitted to the dual-title degree program in Women’s Studies prior to taking the candidacy exam.  In addition to the admission requirements set forth by the Graduate Council and the Department of Philosophy, students will be admitted to the dual-title degree program in Women’s Studies by an admissions committee of Women’s Studies faculty.

Students applying to the dual-title program must submit: a copy of the Graduate School Application originally submitted to the Philosophy Department; official transcripts from all previous coursework; official GRE scores; a writing sample; a personal statement that describes how the dual degree program fits with their scholarly interests; and one letter of recommendation from a Women's Studies faculty member at Penn State.

GPA and GRE Requirements

Applicants entering with only an undergraduate degree should have a junior/senior cumulative average of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale), and, where applicable, a minimum GPA of 3.50 for all graduate work previously undertaken. Exceptions to the minimum GPA requirement may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests at the discretion of the program.

M.A. Degree Requirements

To qualify for the dual-title degree in Philosophy and Women’s Studies, students must satisfy the Philosophy M.A. degree requirements listed in the “Degree Requirements” section above.  In addition to the Philosophy Department requirements listed above, the minimum course requirements for this dual-title M.A. degree are as follows:

A total of 12 credits of course work in Women’s Studies. Of these 12 credits, 9 must come from the required core course sequence in Women’s Studies, which is comprised of the following courses:

WMNST 501.  Feminist Perspectives in Research and Teaching Across the Disciplines (3)
WMNST 502.  Global Perspectives on Feminism (3)
WMNST 507.  Feminist Theory (3)

The other 3 credits must be chosen in consultation with the Women’s Studies Graduate Officer. Penn State allows a maximum of 10 transfer credits of high-quality graduate work to be applied toward the requirements for a graduate degree, subject to restrictions outlined in the Transfer Courses section of the Graduate Bulletin.

One faculty member from Women's Studies should be included on the master's committee. In addition, students should select a thesis topic that reflects their inquiry in women's studies. In the event that the master's thesis requirement is waived by the Philosophy Department, students need to take three additional credits of Women's Studies course work and complete a master's paper on a topic approved by the student's committee.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

To qualify for the dual-title degree in Philosophy and Women’s Studies, students must satisfy the Philosophy Ph.D. degree requirements listed in the “Degree Requirements” section above.  In addition to the Philosophy Department requirements listed above, the minimum course requirements for this dual-title Ph.D. degree are as follows:

18 credits of course work in Women’s Studies. Of these 18 credits, 9 must come from the required core course sequence in Women’s Studies, which is comprised of the following courses:

WMNST 501.  Feminist Perspectives in Research and Teaching Across the Disciplines (3)
WMNST 502.  Global Perspectives on Feminism (3)
WMNST 507.  Feminist Theory (3)

Of the remaining 9 credits, at least 6 of these credits must be at the 500 level, and all of them must be chosen in consultation with the Women’s Studies Graduate Officer. Penn State allows a maximum of 10 transfer credits of high-quality graduate work to be applied toward the requirements for a graduate degree, subject to restrictions outlined in the Transfer Courses section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Candidacy

In accordance with Graduate Council policy, the candidacy committee must include at least one member of the Women’s Studies Graduate Faculty. Faculty members who hold appointments in both programs’ graduate faculty may serve in a combined role.

Because students must first be admitted to a graduate major program of study before they may apply to and be considered for admission into a dual-title graduate degree program, dual-title graduate degree students may require an additional semester to fulfill requirements for both areas of study and, therefore, the candidacy examination may be delayed one semester beyond the normal period allowable.

The dual-title field must be fully integrated into the candidacy exam for the doctoral program. In addition, the student will be required to present a portfolio of work in Women's Studies to their committee. Such a portfolio would include a statement of the student's interdisciplinary research interests, a program plan, and samples of writing that indicate the student's work in Women's Studies.

Doctoral Committee Composition

In addition to the general Graduate Council requirements for doctoral committees, the doctoral committee of a Philosophy and Women’s Studies dual-title doctoral degree student must include at least two members who are Women’s Studies-affiliated Faculty. Faculty members who hold appointments in both programs’ Graduate Faculty may serve in a combined role. If the chair of the committee representing Philosophy is not also a member of the Graduate Faculty in Women’s Studies, a member of the committee representing Women’s Studies must be appointed as co-chair.

Comprehensive Exams

The Women's Studies affiliated faculty members on the student's committee are responsible for administering a comprehensive examination in Women's Studies that constitutes a portion of the student's comprehensive exams. The women's studies portion of the exam will focus on the following areas: feminist theory, feminist methodology, global feminism, and feminist studies in the student's discipline.

Dissertation

The candidate must complete a dissertation and pass a final oral examination (the dissertation defense) on a topic that reflects their original research and education in both Philosophy and Women’s Studies in order to earn the dual- title Ph.D. degree.  The dissertation must be accepted by the doctoral committee, the head of the graduate program, and the Graduate School.

Student Aid for Philosophy Graduate Students

Every student admitted to the department's Ph.D. program receives full assistantship or fellowship funding (stipend and tuition waiver) for five years (assuming reasonable progress). In addition to the many fellowships, graduate assistantships, and other forms of financial aid described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin, the department awards annually an Edwin Erle Sparks Fellowship in the Humanities. In the last several years, Philosophy graduate students have received numerous external national and international fellowships and awards (such as DADD, Fulbright, Javits, Mellon). Many Philosophy graduate students have received assistantship support for interdisciplinary teaching assignments in programs such as American Studies, Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Religious Studies, and Women's Studies. Students on graduate assistantships must adhere to the course load limits set forth in the Graduate Bulletin.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 699 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

 

Last Revised by the Department: Summer Semester 2017

Blue Sheet Item #: 46-01-000

Review Date: 8/22/2017

Faculty linked: 6/27/14

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