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University Bulletin
Graduate Degree Programs

Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD)

Program Home Page

DIANE L. WILLIAMS, Head of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
308 Ford Building
814-865-3177
cyw2@psu.edu

 

Degrees Conferred:

Ph.D., M.S.
Dual-Title Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Language Science

 

The Graduate Faculty

 

The Program

The goals of the program in Communication Sciences and Disorders are to train professionals to conduct research and be consumers of research in communication sciences and disorders and to prepare competent professionals to habilitate and rehabilitate individuals who have speech, language, and/or hearing problems. The program also serves to provide students in other curricula at Penn State with orientation toward and information about communication sciences and disorders.

Facilities for student training and research include in-house clinical therapy and diagnostic services, laboratories in speech science and audiology, and affiliated schools and clinics. The program enjoys academic, research, and clinical relationships with a number of related programs at Penn State and draws upon academic work from related areas as part of the graduate training in communication sciences and disorders. Preparation is given for school and professional certifications and licensure. The CSD academic program is accredited by the Council of Academic Affairs of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Master's-level graduate study requires a full-time externship experience, ordinarily occurring during the final semester of study.

Admission Requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) are required for admission. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Approximately 35 credits are required for admission, distributed among speech pathology, audiology, speech science, education, and psychology, and including a course in statistics. Students entering without an undergraduate degree in CSD will be required to take additional make-up work.

Students with a 3.00 junior/senior average (on a 4.00 scale) and with appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission. The best-qualified applicants will be accepted up to the number of spaces that are available for new students. Usually students earn a master's degree in communication sciences and disorders prior to being considered for doctoral study, although persons with master's degrees in other fields will be considered for a doctoral program.

Master's Degree Requirements

The master's degrees require a minimum of 50 graduate credits beyond admission standards. Students usually earn 55 to 65 credits to complete a degree, over four semesters and a summer of study.

There is a nonthesis option for the Master of Science degree, requiring a paper and additional course credits in lieu of a thesis. The master's program of study provides course work and practicum for advanced and/or professional-level licensure.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

The Doctor of Philosophy degree normally requires a master's degree in communication sciences and disorders or a related field, plus a minimum of two years of advanced study, and presentation and oral defense of a research-based dissertation.

The communication and foreign language requirement is a minimum of 6 credits of statistics beyond the first course, plus 9 credits selected from among statistics, technical writing, computer science, research design, or a foreign language.

Two research exercises, one of which is used for doctoral candidacy evaluation early in the doctoral program, are required prior to the dissertation. Comprehensive written examinations in the areas of a student's interest and an optional minor field examination, plus an oral examination prior to dissertation, are required.

Details of a student's doctoral program are determined by the doctoral committee.

Dual-Title Ph.D. Degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Language Science

Graduate students with research and educational interests in language science may apply to the Communication Sciences and Disorders and Language Science Degree Program. The goal of the dual-title degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Language Science is to enable graduate students from Communication Sciences and Disorders to acquire the knowledge and skills of their major area of specialization in Communication Sciences and Disorders, while at the same time gaining the perspective of the various disciplines contributing to the study of language science.

Admission Requirements

For admission to the dual-title degree under this program, a student must first apply and be admitted to the Communication Sciences and Disorders graduate program and the Graduate School. Students considered for admission to the doctoral program have a Masters program GPA above 3.0/4.0, outstanding letters of recommendation, a written statement of scholarly interests and goals, and have completed the GRE. New graduate students in Communication Sciences and Disorders will receive information about the Language Science dual-title program, and may discuss their interest with one or more Language Science faculty in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, in order to obtain a recommendation for admission to the Language Science program. Once accepted into the Communication Sciences and Disorders program, and with a recommendation from a Language Science program faculty member in that department, the student may apply to the dual-title Ph.D. program in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Language Science by submitting a letter describing the student's interest in the program. The student's letter will be forwarded to a committee that will include the Director of the Linguistics Program, one of the Co-Directors of the Center for Language Science, and a third faculty member within the Center for Language Science. All three committee members will be affiliated with the Program in Linguistics. Upon the recommendation of this committee, the student will be admitted to the dual-title degree program in Language Science. The admission requirements of the Language Science dual-title Ph.D. program are that the student must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate School and the major department. The admission requirements of the doctoral program in Communication Sciences and Disorders listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Degree Requirements

To qualify for a dual-title degree, students must satisfy the requirements of the Communication Sciences and Disorders program in which they are primarily enrolled. In addition, they must satisfy the requirements described below, as established by the Language Sciences program committee. Within this framework, final course selection is determined by the student and their Communication Sciences and Disorders program advisor.

The doctoral degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Language Sciences is awarded only to students who are admitted to the Communication Sciences and Disorders doctoral program and admitted to the dual-title degree in Language Science. The minimum requirements for the dual-title Ph.D. degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Language, in addition to the Communication Sciences and Disorders requirements are as follows:

Course Work: 21 credits of 500-level courses

6 credits:
LING 521 Proseminar in the Language Science of Bilingualism
LING 522 Proseminar in Professional Issues in Language Science

3 credits Research Methods/Statistics in Language Science:
LING 525 Experimental Research Methods in Psycholinguistics
PSY 507 Analysis of Psychological Data I
PSY 508 Analysis of Psychological Data II

3 credits in Theoretical Linguistics
LING 500 Syntax II
LING 504 Phonology II

3 credits in Cognitive Neuroscience or Psycholinguistics
LING 520 Seminar in Psycholinguistics
PSY 511 Seminar in Contemporary Psychology
PSY 520 Seminar in Psycholinguistics

6 credits in Research Internships
These internships will provide experience in the conduct of research; at least on internship must be with a mentor other than the student's dissertation advisor. (Students will choose one course among the following CSD 596, GER 596, LING 596, PSY 596, SPAN 596).

Particular courses may satisfy both the Communication Sciences and Disorders requirements and those in the Language Science dual-title program. Final course selection is determined by the student in consultation with their doctoral advisor and committee. In most cases, the number of total credits earned by a dual-title student will be from 6-12 more than those normally earned by a student in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Some courses which meet Language Science requirements (e.g., theoretical linguistics, neuroscience, psycholinguistics) may also fulfill the Communication Sciences and Disorders requirements for a related area outside the department; however, dual-title students are not required to count any particular Language Science requirement as their outside area. Dual-title students who choose an outside content area not related to Language Science will require more time to complete their program.

Students are expected to participate in weekly Language Science Research meeting each semester in residence.

Student Aid

Student Aid Fellowships, traineeships, graduate assistantships, and other forms of financial aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS (CSD) course list

 

Last Revised by the Department: Spring Semester 2010

Blue Sheet Item #: 38-07-006

Review Date: 06/22/2010

Faculty linked: 6/5/14

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