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University Bulletin
Undergraduate Degree Programs

Earth and Mineral Sciences

Materials Science and Engineering - ARCHIVE

ARCHIVED FILE
Begin Date: Spring Semester 2002
End Date: Spring Semester 2005

Materials Science and Engineering - ARCHIVE

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (MATSE)

PROFESSOR GARY L. MESSING, Head, Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PROFESSOR JOHN R. HELLMANN,
Associate Head of Undergraduate Studies, Materials Science and Engineering

The future can be appropriately termed the age of materials. In addition to the traditional engineering applications of metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers, new materials and composites must be developed by materials scientists to aid progress in communications, computing, electronics, biomedicine, transportation, aerospace, defense, and the production and efficient use of energy.

Our curriculum is structured to provide students with a well-rounded engineering education with special emphasis on materials science and engineering that will meet the needs of industry, academia, and government.  Specifically, upon graduation, our students will:

        � Possess the ability to apply the fundamentals of mathematics and the physical sciences to the development, characterization, and design of and with materials for engineering applications.

        � Possess a general knowledge of all classes of engineering materials, with specific expertise in one of the sub-disciplines: ceramics, metals, polymers, and electronic and photonic materials.

          Understand the inter-relationships between processing, properties, and performance of materials.

        � Have the ability to define problems, to develop and evaluate economically feasible solutions from diverse knowledge databases, and to implement such solutions.

          Possess the ability to perform effectively on cross-functional teams, both within the discipline and in multi-disciplinary settings.

          Be adept at using the modern tools of materials science and engineering including instrumentation for characterizing the structure and properties of materials, and computational hardware and software for analysis, design, and communication.

          Understand the global and societal context of engineering problems, responsibility to their profession and society and the ethics associated with it, and the value of lifelong learning.

To achieve these objectives, students in materials sciences and engineering begin with a background in basic chemistry, mathematics, and physics, which are the foundation for broad-based materials properties, processing, and applications courses. Commencing with their junior year, students take courses in Materials Science and Engineering and specialized courses in one of four options: Ceramic Science and Engineering, Electronic and Photonic Materials, Metals Science and Engineering, or Polymer Science and Engineering.   The curricula integrate classroom instruction and laboratory experience, and culminate in a capstone research and design experience which is documented in the form of a thesis in the senior year.

The curricula for each of the options in Materials Science and Engineering are described in the following sections.

CERAMIC SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION:

PROFESSOR DAVID J. GREEN, Option Counselor

The B.S. program in the Ceramic Science and Engineering option in Materials Science and Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone: 410-347-7700. This option covers the manufacture and usage of a wide variety of inorganic materials that usually include high temperatures. The program helps prepare students for operating, research, and development positions in all sections of the ceramic industry and for graduate studies. Graduates also find employment in many other industries that use ceramic materials, such as iron and steel, electrical and electronic, energy generation, automotive, aeronautical, and aerospace. Many find employment in industries that manufacture composite materials such as glass-ceramics, metal-ceramics, or glass-metal structures.

For the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering with an option in Ceramic Science and Engineering, a minimum of 127 credits is required.

ELECTRONIC AND PHOTONIC MATERIALS OPTION:

PROFESSOR SUZANNE E. MOHNEY, Option Counselor

The B.S. program in the Electronic and Photonic Materials option in Materials Science and Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone: 410-347-7700. This option provides specialized courses dealing with the processing, properties, and performance of semiconductor, optoelectronic, and optical materials and devices. The graduates contribute in the electronics, telecommunications, and computer industries or pursue advanced studies in materials science and engineering.

For the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering with an option in Electronic and Photonic Materials, a minimum of 126.5 credits is required.

METALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION:

PROFESSOR DIGBY D. MACDONALD, Option Counselor

The B.S. program in the Metals Science and Engineering option in Materials Science and Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone: 410-347-7700. The metals option provides an opportunity to explore a broad range of both scientific and engineering principles as applied to metals and alloys. A graduate of this option will thus typically apply basic concepts of chemistry, physics, or engineering science to problems concerning the processing or properties of metals. Although metallurgists are often employed by metals-producing industries, an increasingly large fraction are finding employment in a diverse group of industries that use metals, such as those in the electronics or aerospace fields. Many graduates pursue advanced studies.

For the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering with an option in Metals Science and Engineering, a minimum of 126 credits is required.

POLYMER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION:

PROFESSOR EVANGELOS MANIAS, Option Counselor

The B.S. program in the Polymer Science and Engineering option in Materials Science and Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone: 410-347-7700. This option allows the student to establish a firm foundation in the basic sciences and to apply this knowledge to a study of the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of synthetic and natural polymers.

Polymers are a major class of materials consisting of macromolecules of very high molecular weight. Polymers are pervasive in today's technological society and find numerous applications in such diverse fields as plastics, elastomers (rubber), adhesives, surface coatings (paints), biomaterials, textiles, paper, packaging, and composite materials.

This option helps prepare graduates for research, development, and technical sales positions in numerous materials and chemical industries that either produce or utilize polymers; or to proceed to advanced studies in polymer science or related technical fields.

For the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering with an option in Polymer Science and Engineering, a minimum of 126 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin. Note
: The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) does not permit the use of skills courses to satisfy the Arts category of General Education.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 105-107 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS):  57 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (51 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 013 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(1), CHEM 015 GN(1), EM SC 100S GWS(3)[71], MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
MATSE 201(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
IE 424(3), MATSE 400(3), MATSE 401(3), MATSE 430(3), MATSE 460(1), MATSE 493W(1), MATSE 494W(2) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)

CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or CMPSC 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTIONS: 48-50 credits

CERAMIC SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION: 49-50 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (34 credits)
MATH 251(4) (Sem: 3-4),
MATSE 402(3), MATSE 410(3)[1], MATSE 413(3), MATSE 436(3), MATSE 466(0.5) (Sem: 5-6)
MATSE 490(1), MATSE 411(3), MATSE 412(3), MATSE 415(3), MATSE 417(3), MATSE 435(3), MATSE 467(0.5), MATSE 468(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
E MCH 011(3), E MCH 013(3); or E MCH 210(5) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2), MATH 231(2); or MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits in consultation with adviser (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

ELECTRONIC AND PHOTONIC MATERIALS OPTION: 48.5-49.5 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (30.5 credits)
MATH 251(4) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 418(3), E SC 314(3), MATSE 402(3)[1], MATSE 413(3), MATSE 435(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MATSE 417(3), MATSE 450(3), MATSE 455(3), MATSE 463(1), MATSE 469(0.5), MATSE 490(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
E MCH 011(3), E MCH 013(3); or E MCH 210(5) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2), MATH 231(2); or MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits in consultation with adviser (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

METALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION: 48 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (32-33 credits)
MATH 251(4) (Sem: 3-4)
MATSE 310W(2), MATSE 402(3)[1], MATSE 423(4)[1], MATSE 436(3), MATSE 471(1) (Sem: 5-6)
MATSE 417(3), MATSE 421(2-3), MATSE 422(3), MATSE 425(3), MATSE 426(3), MATSE 472(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
E MCH 011(3), E MCH 013(3); or E MCH 210(5) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2), MATH 231(2); or MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of technical courses from department list. At least 3 credits must be in MATSE and 3 credits must be in the engineering sciences. (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

POLYMER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION: 48 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (36 credits)
MATH 231(2), MATH 250(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CHEM 036(2), CHEM 038(3), CHEM 039(3) (Sem: 3-6)
MATSE 441(3)[1], MATSE 443(3)[1], MATSE 436(3), MATSE 444(3), MATSE 447(3) (Sem: 5-8)
MATSE 445(3), MATSE 473(1), MATSE 448(3), MATSE 490(1) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from MATSE 402(3), MATSE 404(3), MATSE 413(3), MATSE 435(3), or MATSE 455(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits technical electives from department list.  At least 3 credits must be in MATSE and 3 credits in the engineering sciences.  (Students may apply 6 credits to ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Engineering students are expected to take at least one sequence of humanities, social science, or arts courses of either 6 or 9 credits that culminates in a higher-level course. Humanities, arts, and social science courses should compose an integral part of the engineering program and not be limited to a selection of unrelated introductory courses. Close consultation with advisers on these issues is warranted.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: CAS 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

Last Revised by the Department: Spring Semester 2002

Blue Sheet Item #: 30-04-026A

Review Date: 1/21/05

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