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University Bulletin

Undergraduate Degree Programs

Engineering

Biomedical Engineering

University Park, College of Engineering (BME)

PROFESSOR CHENG DONG, Head of the Department of Biomedical Engineering

The Biomedical Engineering curriculum emphasizes the continuous integration of classical and modern engineering principles with the life sciences and health care. Biomedical Engineers apply these skills to innovation in the health care industry, basic biological sciences, and the underpinning of medical practice.

Consistent with the mission of Penn State University and the College of Engineering, the Penn State Bachelor of Science program in Biomedical Engineering aims to create world-class engineers who will, after graduation, contribute to social and economic development through the application of engineering to the solution of problems in medicine and biology.

Program Educational Objectives

Three to five years after graduation, we expect our graduates to be:

  • employed in industry and government positions which include, but are not limited to, research and development, regulation, manufacturing, quality assurance and sales and marketing, or,
  • enrolled in graduate school, continuing education, or other professional development programs related to biomedical sciences and engineering, or,
  • enrolled in medical school, dental school, or other health-related professional training programs.

Program Outcomes (Student Outcomes)

Upon graduation from the Biomedical Engineering program, students will have:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of advanced mathematics, (including differential equations and statistics), science, and engineering to solve problems at the interface of engineering and biology
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data from living and non-living systems
  3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  4. An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. An ability to communicate effectively
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice
  12. An understanding of physics, chemistry, and of physiology at molecular, cellular and organ levels
  13. An ability to address problems associated with the interaction between living and non-living materials and systems

ENTRANCE TO MAJOR -- In addition to the minimum grade point average (GPA) requirements* described in the University Policies, all College of Engineering entrance to major course requirements must also be completed with a minimum grade of C: CHEM 110 (GN), MATH 140 (GQ), MATH 141 (GQ), MATH 250 or MATH 251, PHYS 211 (GN) and PHYS 212 (GN). All of these courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the admission to major process is carried out.

*In the event that the major is under enrollment control, a higher minimum cumulative grade-point average is likely to be needed and students must be enrolled in the College of Engineering or Division of Undergraduate Studies at the time of confirming their major choice.

For the B.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering, a minimum of 130-131 credits are required. The baccalaureate program in Biomedical Engineering at University Park is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., www.abet.org.

 Students in residence at the Commonwealth campuses may satisfy the course requirements for semesters 1-3. They should then transfer to University Park to begin studies in their major beginning with semester 4.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of the Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 112-113 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 89 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (72 credits)
EDSGN 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 200 GQ(3), E MCH 210(5), MATH 230(4), MATH 251(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
BME 201(3)[1] (Sem: 4)
BME 301(4)[1], BME 303(3)[1], BME 313(3)[1], BME 401(3)[1], BME 402(3)[1], BME 403(1) (Sem: 5-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
BME 429(2), BME 440(1), BME 450W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 102 GS(3), or ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
BIOL 141 GN(3)[1], BIOL 142(1)[1], or BIOL 240W(4)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
CAS 100A GWS(3) or CAS 100B GWS(3) (Sem: 4-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits of Science or Engineering Elective courses from departmental list (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 23-24 credits

BIOCHEMICAL OPTION: (24 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
BME 409(3), BME 413(3) (Sem: 5-6)
BME 423(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
CHEM 202(3) or CHEM 210(3) (Sem: 4-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 9 credits from Biochemical Option department list (Sem: 6-8)
Select 3 credits from Related Electives department list (Sem: 6-8)

MEDICAL IMAGING AND DEVICES OPTION: (23 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (7 credits)
E E 210(4) (Sem: 3-4)
BME 406(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES ( 4 credits)
CMPEN 271(3) and CMPEN 275(1) or CMPEN 270(4) or E E 310(4) or E E 330(4) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 6 credits from the Related Electives department list (Sem: 6-8 )
Select 6 credits from Medical Imaging and Device Option department list (Sem: 7-8)

BIOMATERIALS OPTION: (24 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
MATSE 201(3), BME 409(3), BME 443(3) (Sem: 5-6)
BME 446(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
CHEM 202(3) OR CHEM 210(3) (Sem: 4-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from Related Electives department list (Sem: 6-8)
Select 6 credits from Biomaterials Option department list (Sem: 7-8)

BIOMECHANICS OPTION: (24 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
E MCH 212(3), E MCH 315(2), E MCH 316(1) (Sem: 4-6)
BME 409(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 9 credits from Biomechanics Option department list (Sem: 6-8)
Select 6 credits from Related Electives department list (Sem: 6-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

Last Revised by the Department: Fall Semester 2013

Blue Sheet Item #: 42-03-040

Review Date: 11/19/2013

R & T: Approved 5/24/2013

UCA Revision #1: 8/2/06
UCA Revision #2: 7/26/07

EN

Accreditation statement updated by Publications, per COE: 8/15/11