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University Bulletin
Undergraduate Degree Programs

Engineering

ARCHIVED FILE
Begin Date: Summer Session 2006
End Date: Summer Session 2011

Surveying Engineering - ARCHIVE

University College, Penn State Wilkes-Barre (SUR E)

PROFESSOR WESLEY PARKS, Program Coordinator, Penn State Wilkes-Barre
PROFESSOR THOMAS A. SEYBERT, Director of Engineering Technology, Penn State Wilkes-Barre
PROFESSOR SVEN BILEN, Interim Head, School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs, Penn State University Park

The Surveying Engineering major provides a basic undergraduate education required for private and public service in the profession of surveying. Particular emphasis is placed on fundamental surveying principles required in all areas of surveying. Instruction is provided in the main divisions of surveying, including land surveying, mapping, photogrammetry, data analysis and adjustment, geodesy and map projection coordinate systems, remote sensing, geographic information systems, and land development. Students study various data collection techniques using surveying tools including total stations, levels, softcopy photogrammetry, satellite imagery, and the global positioning system (GPS). They also study legal principles related to land surveying, professional ethics, applications for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in surveying, and data management techniques. Through the use of elective courses, students can specialize in the areas of GIS, photogrammetry, remote sensing, land surveying, and geodesy. Through the use of projects and capstone courses students will design measurement systems, alignments, land information systems, and land development.

Specific educational objectives of the program are designed so that the graduate will have:

  • A solid understanding of the basic principles of mathematics, science, and engineering and the technical competency to use the techniques, skills and modern surveying tools for practice in surveying engineering as well as for graduate education.
  • An understanding of the principles in surveying engineering and understanding of professional practice and ethical issues including the ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • The ability to work in a team and develop problem-solving skills that include oral and written communication skills to effectively communicate technical and professional information.
  • An awareness of organizations and activities that allow them to develop leadership skills, gain exposure to the surveying profession, and gain a broad understanding of contemporary societal issues.
  • A recognition of the need for continued learning.

For the B. S. degree a minimum of 128 credits is required. The baccalaureate program in Surveying is accredited by the Applied Science Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone: 410-347-7700, or www.abet.org (Opens New Window). The Surveying program was renamed to Surveying Engineering effective Fall 2004. Surveying Engineering will be reviewed for accreditation as Surveying Engineering during Fall 2005.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 107 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (72 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2-3), SUR 111(3)[1], SUR 112(3), SUR 162(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
CAS 100A GWS(3), CMPSC 201 GQ(3), MATH 230(4), MATH 251(4), STAT 401(3), SUR 222(3), SUR 241(3)[1], SUR 262(2) (Sem: 3-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), SUR 272(3)[1], SUR 341(3), SUR 351(3), SUR 362(3), SUR 372W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
SUR 441(3), SUR 471(3), SUR 482(3), SUR 490(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (26 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar
EDSGN 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 110 GN(3) or GEOG 010 GN(3) and PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits, from SUR 313(3), SUR 325(3), SUR 335(3), SUR 375(2), SUR 445(3), SUR 455(3), SUR 465(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from department list of technical electives (Sem: 5-6, 9-10)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

Last Revised by the Department: Summer Session 2006

Blue Sheet Item #: 34-03-019

Review Date: 7/25/08

UCA Revision #1: 8/14/06
UCA Revision #2: 7/30/07

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