Nutritional Sciences, B.S.

Program Code: NUTR_BS

Program Description

Nutrition is a dynamic science that incorporates knowledge of human biology and biochemistry to understand how the body utilizes nutrients and related substances for optimal health throughout the lifecycle. Students gain an understanding of how the interplay of nutrition and lifestyle relate to current public health issues as well as the development and nutrition management of chronic and acute diseases. Students learn the scientific rationale and practice methodology to assess the nutritional status of individuals in the clinical setting and for population analysis. They will use these skills to implement medical nutrition therapy or understand nutrition guidelines, standards, and policies to improve the health and well-being of the population.

Students may select one or more Options: Behavioral Nutrition and Public Health, Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry, and Nutrition and Dietetics. The Nutrition and Dietetics Option is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND).

Behavioral Nutrition and Public Health Option

This option integrates knowledge of social and behavioral sciences with human physiology and nutrition. Students learn to apply knowledge of nutrition to improve the health and well-being of individuals and populations by applying nutrition principles in different practice settings. Graduates of this option can seek employment in public health and policy, business including the food industry, community, and international agencies, schools, or continue to graduate study in nutrition or related fields.

Nutrition and Dietetics Option

This option offers multi-disciplinary training in the biological sciences, social and behavioral sciences, and business principles to prepare students to work in a variety of settings and to be eligible to continue their education to acquire the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credential. It links nutrition and human behavior by applying nutrition principles, counseling skills, and educational skills to improving the nutritional status and health of individuals and communities. Students gain training that will prepare them to work in a variety of clinical, community, and business settings. It also prepares students for management positions in the nutrition field and food systems settings. Graduates satisfy the current requirements for application to accredited post-baccalaureate dietetic supervised practice programs and Master’s degree programs. Upon satisfactory completion of these programs, graduates are eligible to take the registration examination to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN).

Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry Option

This option incorporates knowledge from biology, chemistry, physiology, and physics with nutrition. This option is recommended for students preparing for careers in medicine and other health-related fields such as dentistry, optometry, physician assistant, physical therapy, and chiropractic, as well as graduate school. Also, this option prepares students for careers in laboratory research in the pharmaceutical or food industries, government, or academia.

What is Nutritional Sciences?

Nutritional Sciences uses nutrition as the backbone to integrate physiological science, behavioral sciences, foods, food systems management, and nutrition as medicine to prepare students to help individuals and communities locally and globally. Students are uniquely prepared to integrate their strong science foundation and nutrition knowledge to help others lead healthier lives. Areas of study include the application of nutrition principles to health promotion and wellness, sports performance, research and intervention science, medical nutrition therapy, and behavioral interventions.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES

You Might Like This Program If...

  • You want to learn about nutrition and foods’ connection to health.
  • You plan to go to medical school, physician assistant school, and other health-related pre-professional programs.
  • You want to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist.
  • You want to work in scientific research related to human health or the food industry.
  • You want to advocate for healthier communities using sustainable food practices and access to nutritious food.
  • You want to learn about interventions to nutrition-related health problems that affect the world’s populations.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT WHY STUDENTS CHOOSE TO STUDY NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES

Entrance to Major

Behavioral Nutrition and Public Health Option

In order to be eligible for entrance to this option in the major, a student must:

  1. attain at least a C (2.00) cumulative grade-point average for all courses taken at the University; and
  2. have third-semester classification.

Nutrition and Dietetics Option

In order to be eligible for entrance to this option in the major, a student must:

  1. attain a C or better in NUTR 251, BIOL 161, BIOL 162, BIOL 163, BIOL 164, and CHEM 110 or CHEM 130.

Retention within the Nutrition and Dietetics Option

Retention will be determined through verification of sustained academic growth as demonstrated by earning of grades of C or higher in all of the Nutritional Sciences prescribed and related courses. Failure to do so will result in referral of the student to the student's academic adviser so that they may work together to develop a clear written strategy and a time frame for the student to return to good standing. Should the student not address the issue, the faculty may advise the student into a different Nutritional Sciences option. To graduate, a student enrolled in the nutrition and dietetics option must earn a grade of C or better in all prescribed and major requirement courses, as specified by Senate Policy 82-44.

Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry Option

In order to be eligible for entrance to this option in the major, a student must:

  1. attain at least a C (2.00) cumulative grade-point average for all courses taken at the University; and
  2. have third-semester classification.

Degree Requirements

For the Bachelor of Science degree in Nutritional Sciences, a minimum of 120 credits is required:

Requirement Credits
General Education 45
Electives 2-5
Requirements for the Major 88-91

17-18 of the 45 credits for General Education are included in the Requirements for the Major. This includes: Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry Option: 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GHW courses; 9 credits of GN courses. Behavioral Nutrition and Public Health Option: 3 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GHW courses; 8 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses. Nutrition and Dietetics Option; 3 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GHW courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses.

Per Senate Policy 83.80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. NUTR requires students to complete 24 credits for the major through courses taken at University Park. Courses taken at other Penn State campuses may not be counted toward this 24 credit minimum. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for this major.

General Education

Connecting career and curiosity, the General Education curriculum provides the opportunity for students to acquire transferable skills necessary to be successful in the future and to thrive while living in interconnected contexts. General Education aids students in developing intellectual curiosity, a strengthened ability to think, and a deeper sense of aesthetic appreciation. These are requirements for all baccalaureate students and are often partially incorporated into the requirements of a program. For additional information, see the General Education Requirements section of the Bulletin and consult your academic adviser.

The keystone symbol Keystone/General Education Course appears next to the title of any course that is designated as a General Education course. Program requirements may also satisfy General Education requirements and vary for each program.

Foundations (grade of C or better is required.)

  • Quantification (GQ): 6 credits
  • Writing and Speaking (GWS): 9 credits

Knowledge Domains

  • Arts (GA): 6 credits
  • Health and Wellness (GHW): 3 credits
  • Humanities (GH): 6 credits
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS): 6 credits
  • Natural Sciences (GN): 9 credits

Integrative Studies (may also complete a Knowledge Domain requirement)

  • Inter-Domain or Approved Linked Courses: 6 credits

University Degree Requirements

First Year Engagement

All students enrolled in a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies at University Park, and the World Campus are required to take 1 to 3 credits of the First-Year Seminar, as specified by their college First-Year Engagement Plan.

Other Penn State colleges and campuses may require the First-Year Seminar; colleges and campuses that do not require a First-Year Seminar provide students with a first-year engagement experience.

First-year baccalaureate students entering Penn State should consult their academic adviser for these requirements.

Cultures Requirement    

6 credits are required and may satisfy other requirements

  • United States Cultures: 3 credits
  • International Cultures: 3 credits

Writing Across the Curriculum

3 credits required from the college of graduation and likely prescribed as part of major requirements.

Total Minimum Credits

A minimum of 120 degree credits must be earned for a baccalaureate degree. The requirements for some programs may exceed 120 credits. Students should consult with their college or department adviser for information on specific credit requirements.

Quality of Work

Candidates must complete the degree requirements for their major and earn at least a 2.00 grade-point average for all courses completed within their degree program.

Limitations on Source and Time for Credit Acquisition

The college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. Credit used toward degree programs may need to be earned from a particular source or within time constraints (see Senate Policy 83-80). For more information, check the Suggested Academic Plan for your intended program.

Requirements for the Major

To graduate, a student enrolled in the major must earn a grade of C or better in each course designated by the major as a C-required course, as specified by Senate Policy 82-44.

Common Requirements for the Major (All Options)

Prescribed Courses
Prescribed Courses: Require a grade of C or better
BIOL 161Human Anatomy and Physiology I - Lecture Keystone/General Education Course3
BIOL 163Human Anatomy and Physiology II - Lecture Keystone/General Education Course3
BMB 211Elementary Biochemistry3
NUTR 251Introductory Principles of Nutrition Keystone/General Education Course3
NUTR 445Energy and Macronutrient Metabolism3
NUTR 446Micronutrient Metabolism3
NUTR 451Nutrition throughout the Life Cycle3
Additional Courses
Additional Courses: Require a grade of C or better
STAT 200Elementary Statistics Keystone/General Education Course3
or STAT 250 Introduction to Biostatistics Keystone/General Education Course
Requirements for the Option
Select an option64-67

Requirements for the Option

Behavioral Nutrition and Public Health Option (64 credits)
Prescribed Courses
BBH 101Introduction to Biobehavioral Health Keystone/General Education Course3
BBH 440Principles of Epidemiology3
BIOL 162Human Anatomy and Physiology I - Laboratory Keystone/General Education Course1
BIOL 164Human Anatomy and Physiology II - Laboratory Keystone/General Education Course1
NUTR 211RApplying Biochemistry to Nutrition1
NUTR 320Science and Methods of Food Preparation4
NUTR 358Assessment of Nutritional Status3
NUTR 360Nutrition Education and Behavior Change Theory3
NUTR 361Community and Public Health Nutrition3
NUTR 452Nutritional Aspects of Disease3
NUTR 490WNutrition Seminar3
Additional Courses
CHEM 110Chemical Principles I Keystone/General Education Course3
or CHEM 130 Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry Keystone/General Education Course
CHEM 202Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry I3
or CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I
HDFS 129Introduction to Human Development and Family Studies Keystone/General Education Course3
or PSYCH 100 Introductory Psychology Keystone/General Education Course
NUTR 421Biocultural Perspectives on Public Health Nutrition3
or NUTR 425 Global Nutrition Problems: Health, Science, and Ethics
NUTR 175Healthy Food for All: Factors that Influence What we Eat in the US Keystone/General Education Course3
or NUTR 175Z Healthy Food for All: Factors that Influence What we Eat in the US - LINKED Keystone/General Education Course
Select one of the following:3
Economic Principles of Agribusiness Decision Making Keystone/General Education Course
Introductory Microeconomic Analysis and Policy Keystone/General Education Course
Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy Keystone/General Education Course
Food, Nutrition, and Sustainability
Students must choose six (6) credits from the courses listed:6
Communication Methods and Media
AEE 450
Economics of the Food System
Investigating the U.S. Food System: How food moves from field to table Keystone/General Education Course
Investigating the U.S. Food System: How food moves from field to table -LINKED Keystone/General Education Course
Community Development Concepts and Practice Keystone/General Education Course
Introduction to Advertising
Public Relations
Global Change and Ecosystems Keystone/General Education Course
Food and the Future Environment Keystone/General Education Course
Environment and Society in a Changing World Keystone/General Education Course
Geographic Perspectives on Environment, Society and Sustainability
Ethnicity, Health and Aging Keystone/General Education Course
The Sustainable Fork: Food Systems Decisions for Away-From-Home Eating
Everyone Eats: Hunger, Food Security & Global Agriculture Keystone/General Education Course
Managing Quality in Food and Nutrition Services
Sustainability, Society, and Well-being
Population and Policy Issues Keystone/General Education Course
Sociology of the Family Keystone/General Education Course
Global Health and Nutrition Policy
Students must choose six (6) credits from the courses listed:6
Leadership Practices: Power, Influences, and Impact
Diversity and Health
Introduction to Global Health Issues
Foundations and Principles of Health Promotion
Global Health Equity
Women's Health Issues
Introduction to Advertising
Public Relations
Environment and Society in a Changing World Keystone/General Education Course
Ethnicity, Health and Aging Keystone/General Education Course
Introduction to Health Services Organization
Social Determinants of Health Keystone/General Education Course
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Choose six (6) additional supporting credits at the 400 level, in consultation with an adviser, from University-wide offerings that provide relevance to this option. No more than three (3) credits may be NUTR 496. See program list of recommended courses.6
Nutrition and Dietetics Option (64 credits)
Prescribed Courses
Prescribed Courses: Require a grade of C or better
BIOL 162Human Anatomy and Physiology I - Laboratory Keystone/General Education Course1
BIOL 164Human Anatomy and Physiology II - Laboratory Keystone/General Education Course1
HM 329Principles of Food Production Management3
HM 330Food Production and Service Management3
MICRB 106Elementary Microbiology Keystone/General Education Course3
MICRB 107Elementary Microbiology Laboratory Keystone/General Education Course1
NUTR 211RApplying Biochemistry to Nutrition1
NUTR 320Science and Methods of Food Preparation4
NUTR 358Assessment of Nutritional Status3
NUTR 360Nutrition Education and Behavior Change Theory3
NUTR 361Community and Public Health Nutrition3
NUTR 386Managing Quality in Food and Nutrition Services3
NUTR 391Professional Preparation in Nutrition and Dietetics2
NUTR 393Dietetic Internship Application Development1
NUTR 400Introduction to Nutrition Counseling2
NUTR 452Nutritional Aspects of Disease3
NUTR 453Medical Nutrition Therapy3
NUTR 490WNutrition Seminar3
NUTR 495Advanced Field Experience in Nutrition3
Additional Courses
CHEM 202Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry I3
or CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I
HDFS 129Introduction to Human Development and Family Studies Keystone/General Education Course3
or PSYCH 100 Introductory Psychology Keystone/General Education Course
Additional Courses: Require a grade of C or better
CHEM 110Chemical Principles I Keystone/General Education Course3
or CHEM 130 Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry Keystone/General Education Course
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 9 credits, in consultation with an adviser, from University-wide offerings that provide relevance to this option. See program list of recommended courses. (At least 6 credits must be at the 400 level and, of those, no more than 3 credits may be NUTR 496.) Three (3) credits may be substituted with credits earned through ROTC.9
Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry Option (66-67 credits)
Prescribed Courses
BIOL 110Biology: Basic Concepts and Biodiversity Keystone/General Education Course4
BIOL 162Human Anatomy and Physiology I - Laboratory Keystone/General Education Course1
BIOL 164Human Anatomy and Physiology II - Laboratory Keystone/General Education Course1
BIOL 230WBiology: Molecules and Cells Keystone/General Education Course4
BMB 212Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory1
CHEM 110Chemical Principles I Keystone/General Education Course3
CHEM 111Experimental Chemistry I Keystone/General Education Course1
CHEM 112Chemical Principles II Keystone/General Education Course3
CHEM 113Experimental Chemistry II Keystone/General Education Course1
MATH 140Calculus With Analytic Geometry I Keystone/General Education Course4
NUTR 175ZHealthy Food for All: Factors that Influence What we Eat in the US - LINKED Keystone/General Education Course3
NUTR 211RApplying Biochemistry to Nutrition1
NUTR 358Assessment of Nutritional Status3
NUTR 452Nutritional Aspects of Disease3
NUTR 490WNutrition Seminar3
PHYS 250Introductory Physics I Keystone/General Education Course4
PHYS 251Introductory Physics II Keystone/General Education Course4
Additional Courses
CHEM 202
CHEM 203
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry I
and Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry II
6
or CHEM 210
CHEM 212
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry II
MICRB 106
MICRB 107
Elementary Microbiology Keystone/General Education Course
and Elementary Microbiology Laboratory Keystone/General Education Course
4-5
or MICRB 201
MICRB 202
Introductory Microbiology
and Introductory Microbiology Laboratory
NUTR 421Biocultural Perspectives on Public Health Nutrition3
or NUTR 425 Global Nutrition Problems: Health, Science, and Ethics
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 9 credits, in consultation with an adviser, from University-wide offerings that provide relevance to this option. Students need to complete at least three (3) credits that cover the topic of ethics. At least six (6) credits must be at the 400 level with no more than three (3) credits of NUTR 496. See program list of recommended courses. Three (3) credits may be substituted with credits earned through ROTC.9

Program Learning Objectives

  • Explain the role of chemical, biochemical, microbiological, and physiological processes and demonstrate how they interrelate with the body’s utilization of nutrients and food components during digestion, absorption, metabolism, and excretion.
  • Describe and apply the functions and interrelationships of nutrients and food in human health, disease prevention, and disease states.
  • Describe food and nutrition programs that contribute to the continuum of nutrition services to improve the health of our population: preconception to old age.
  • Apply leadership and management theory within the healthcare and food service management systems.
  • Integrate the biological, behavioral, socioeconomic and environmental factors related to food and nutrient intakes and needs across the lifespan.
  • Interpret and evaluate nutrition standards and analyze nutritional assessment data to make evidence-based decisions.
  • Locate, interpret, and evaluate research findings and professional literature to explain implications, limitations, and applications to practice.
  • Demonstrate effective and professional technical and scientific written communication skills using various media formats.
  • Demonstrate effective and professional technical and scientific oral communication skills using various media formats.

Academic Advising

The objectives of the university’s academic advising program are to help advisees identify and achieve their academic goals, to promote their intellectual discovery, and to encourage students to take advantage of both in-and out-of class educational opportunities in order that they become self-directed learners and decision makers.

Both advisers and advisees share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed. By encouraging their advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning, advisers assume a significant educational role. The advisee's unit of enrollment will provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser, the information needed to plan the chosen program of study, and referrals to other specialized resources.

READ SENATE POLICY 32-00: ADVISING POLICY

University Park

David A. Cassiday
Nutritional Sciences Adviser
110 Chandlee Laboratory
University Park, PA 16802
814-863-5826
nutrsci@psu.edu

Suggested Academic Plan

The suggested academic plan(s) listed on this page are the plan(s) that are in effect during the 2021-22 academic year. To access previous years' suggested academic plans, please visit the archive to view the appropriate Undergraduate Bulletin edition (Note: the archive only contain suggested academic plans beginning with the 2018-19 edition of the Undergraduate Bulletin).

Behavioral Nutrition and Public Health Option: Nutritional Sciences, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 161 (GN)*†3NUTR 251 (GHW)*†3
BIOL 162 (GN)1BIOL 163 (GN)*†3
PSYCH 100 or HDFS 129 (GS)3BIOL 164 (GN)1
GQ ALEKS Score3ECON 102, 104, or AGBM 1013
General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 15, ENGL 30H, ESL 15, ENGL/CAS 137H recommended)‡13Select 3-4 credits of Electives (Suggest NUTR 170)3-4
First-Year Seminar (elective)1General Education Course (GWS) (CAS 100, CAS 100A, CAS 100B, CAS 100C, ENGL/CAS 138T recommended)‡13
 14 16-17
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 110 or 130 (GN)†23CHEM 202 or 21033
NUTR 175Z3STAT 200 or 250 (GQ)*†3-4
NUTR 3603NUTR 361 (US)3
General Education Course (GH)3BBH 1013
General Education Course (GS)3General Education Course (GA)3
 15 15-16
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BMB 211*3NUTR 3583
NUTR 211R1NUTR 425 (IL) or Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser.53
NUTR 3204NUTR 445*3
NUTR 421 (IL/US) or Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser.53Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser3
General Education Course (GH)43General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 202C recommended)3
 14 15
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
NUTR 446*3NUTR 4523
NUTR 451*3NUTR 490W3
BBH 440 or HPA 4403Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser53
Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser53Select 3 credits of 400-level selection in consultation with academic adviser53
Select 3 credits of 400-level selection in consultation with academic adviser53General Education Course (GA)3
 15 15
Total Credits 119-121

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

Scheduling patterns for courses not taught each semester:

Behavioral Nutrition and Public Health Option: Nutritional Sciences, B.S. at Commonwealth Campuses

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 161 (GN)*†3NUTR 251 (GHW)*†3
BIOL 162 (GN)1BIOL 163 (GN)*†3
PSYCH 100 or HDFS 129 (GS)3BIOL 164 (GN)1
GQ ALEKS Score3ECON 102, 104, or AGBM 1013
General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 15, ENGL 30H, ESL 15, ENGL/CAS 137H recommended)‡13General Education Course (GWS) (CAS 100, CAS 100A, CAS 100B, CAS 100C, ENGL/CAS 138T recommended)‡13
First-Year Seminar (elective)1General Education Course (GS)3
 14 16
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 110 or 130 (GN)†23CHEM 202 or 21033
BBH 1013STAT 200 or 250 (GQ)*†3-4
Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser3Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser3
General Education Course (GH)3General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 202C recommended)3
General Education Course (GA)3General Education Course (GH)43
 15 15-16
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BMB 211*3NUTR 3204
NUTR 175Z3NUTR 3583
NUTR 211R1NUTR 3613
NUTR 3603NUTR 425 (IL) or Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser53
NUTR 421 (IL/US) or Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser53NUTR 445*3
 13 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
NUTR 446*3NUTR 4523
NUTR 451*3NUTR 490W3
BBH 440 or HPA 4403Select 3 credits of 400-level supporting credits in consultation with academic adviser53
Select 3 credits from one of the two themes in consultation with academic adviser53Select 3-4 credits of Electives3-4
Select 3 credits of 400-level supporting credits in consultation with academic adviser53General Education Course (GA)3
 15 15-16
Total Credits 119-121

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

Advising Notes:

Scheduling patterns for courses not taught each semester:

Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry Option: Nutritional Sciences, B.S. at All Campuses

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 110
CHEM 111 (GN)
4CHEM 112
CHEM 113 (GN)
4
BIOL 110 (GN)4BIOL 161 (GN)*†3
Select 3 credits from supporting courses in consultation with academic adviser3BIOL 162 (GN)1
General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 15, ENGL 30H, ESL 15, ENGL/CAS 137H recommended)‡13NUTR 251 (GHW)*†3
First-Year Seminar (elective)1PHIL 132 (suggested) or General Education Course (GH)3
 General Education Course (GWS) (CAS 100, CAS 100A, CAS 100B, CAS 100C, ENGL/CAS 138T recommended)‡13
 15 17
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 202 or 2103CHEM 203 or 2123
MICRB 106 and MICRB 107 or MICRB 201 and MICRB 202 (GN)4-5BIOL 230W (GN)4
MATH 140 (GQ)‡†4STAT 200 or 250 (GQ)*†3-4
BIOL 163*†3General Education Course (GA)3
BIOL 1641 
 15-16 13-14
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BMB 211*3NUTR 445*3
BMB 2121PHYS 2514
NUTR 211R1NUTR 3583
PHYS 2504NUTR 425 (IL/US) or General Education Course (GS)43
NUTR 175Z3General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 202C recommended)3
NUTR 421 (IL/US) or General Education Course (GS)43 
 15 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
NUTR 446*3NUTR 452*3
NUTR 451*3NUTR 490W3
Select 3 credits from 400-level supporting courses in consultation with academic adviser3Select 3 credits from 400-level supporting courses in consultation with academic adviser3
General Education Course (GA)3Select 3 credits from supporting courses in consultation with academic adviser3
General Education Course (GH)3General Education Course (GS)3
 15 15
Total Credits 121-123

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

Scheduling patterns for courses not taught each semester:

Nutrition and Dietetics Option: Nutritional Sciences, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
GQ per ALEKS score†23NUTR 251 (GHW)*#†3 
BIOL 161
BIOL 162 (GN)*#†
4BIOL 163
BIOL 164 (GN)*#†
4 
PSYCH 100 or HDFS 129 (GS)*†3NUTR 170 (suggested supporting class)1 
General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 15, ENGL 30H, ESL 15, ENGL/CAS 137H recommended)‡13General Education Course (GWS) (CAS 100, CAS 100A, CAS 100B, CAS 100C, ENGL/CAS 138T recommended)‡13 
First-Year Seminar (elective)1General Education Course (GA)3 
 14 14 
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
CHEM 110 or 130*#†3CHEM 202 or 210*3 
NUTR 360*3STAT 200 or 250 (GQ)*†3-4 
MICRB 106
MICRB 107 (GN)*†
4NUTR 361*†3 
General Education Course (GS)3General Education Course (GA)3 
Select 3 credits from electives in consultation with an academic adviser3General Education Course (GH)3 
 16 15-16 
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
BMB 211*3NUTR 445*3NUTR 495*3
NUTR 211R*1NUTR 358*3 
NUTR 320*4NUTR 391*2 
NUTR 386*3Select 3 credits from supporting courses in consultation with an academic adviser33 
HM 329*3General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 202A or ENGL 202C recommended)3 
 14 14 3
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
NUTR 446*3NUTR 451*3 
NUTR 393*1NUTR 453*3 
NUTR 400*2NUTR 490W*†3 
HM 330*3Select 3 credits from 400-level supporting courses in consultation with an academic adviser33 
NUTR 452*3General Education Course (GH)3 
Select 3 credits from 400-level supporting courses in consultation with an academic adviser33  
 15 15 
Total Credits 120-121

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

Scheduling patterns for courses not taught each semester:

Within the 30 credits of required General Education Domain courses, students must take 6 credits of Integrative Studies courses (Inter-domain or Linked courses). Students should consult with their academic adviser to select appropriate courses.

Nutrition and Dietetics Option: Nutritional Sciences, B.S. at Commonwealth Campuses

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
GQ per ALEKS score†23NUTR 251 (GHW)*#†3 
BIOL 161
BIOL 162 (GN)*#†
4BIOL 163
BIOL 164 (GN)*#†
4 
PSYCH 100 or HDFS 129 (GS)*†3General Education Course (GWS) (CAS 100, CAS 100A, CAS 100B, CAS 100C, ENGL/CAS 138T recommended)‡13 
General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 15, ENGL 30H, ESL 15, ENGL/CAS 137H recommended)‡13General Education Course (GA)3 
First-Year Seminar (elective)1  
 14 13 
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
CHEM 110 or 130*#†3CHEM 202 or 210*3 
MICRB 106
MICRB 107 (GN)*†
4STAT 200 or 250 (GQ)*†3-4 
General Education Course (GH)*3General Education Course (GWS) (ENGL 202A or ENGL 202C recommended)3 
General Education Course (GS)3General Education Course (GA)3 
Select 3 credits from electives in consultation with an academic adviser3General Education Course (GH)3 
 16 15-16 
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
BMB 211*3NUTR 445*3NUTR 495*3
NUTR 211R*1NUTR 391*2 
NUTR 320*4NUTR 358*3 
NUTR 360*3NUTR 361*†3 
HM 329*3Select 3-4 credits from supporting courses in consultation with an academic adviser (suggest 1 credit NUTR 170)33-4 
 14 14-15 3
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
NUTR 446*3NUTR 451*3 
NUTR 393*1NUTR 453*3 
NUTR 400*2NUTR 490W*†3 
HM 330*3NUTR 452*3 
NUTR 386*3Select 3 credits from 400-level supporting courses in consultation with an academic adviser33 
Select 3 credits from 400-level supporting courses in consultation with an academic adviser33  
 15 15 
Total Credits 119-121

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

Advising Notes:

Scheduling patterns for courses not taught each semester:

Within the 30 credits of required General Education Domain courses, students must take 6 credits of Integrative Studies courses (Inter-domain or Linked courses). Students should consult with their academic adviser to select appropriate courses.

Career Paths

The multidisciplinary nature of the Nutritional Sciences degree prepares students in our program for a variety of career options and for graduate study in research and advanced professional training.

Students who choose the Nutrition and Dietetics option are well prepared for a post-graduate Dietetics supervised practice program that leads to the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credential. With the RDN, students can pursue careers in clinical dietetics, nutrition counseling, sports nutrition, public-health nutrition and policy, culinary nutrition, the food retail industry, sustainability, and applied research.

Courses taken in the Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry option provide a strong science foundation for a variety of biomedical and health-related careers. This option is perfect for students interested in furthering their education by applying to medical, dental, physician assistant, chiropractic schools, or to continue their studies in graduate school for Nutritional Sciences. Students may also seek biomedical careers in research, pharmaceutical or other health related industries.

Students in the Behavioral Nutrition and Public Health (BNPH) option are prepared to work in global programs, public health, health promotion and education. Students in this option can also plan their coursework to meet the requirements needed to apply to health-related pre-professional programs (e.g., occupational therapy, nursing, or physician’s assistant) Students may choose to attend graduate school in Nutritional Sciences, Public Health or a wide variety of other graduate programs.

Careers

Armed with an advanced degree in Nutritional Science (NUTR), you will leverage your Penn State education and a vast network of like-minded professionals to find a fulfilling career that incorporates the physiological and biochemical aspects of nutritional practices in the context of health and wellness.

There is a seemingly endless array of positions in healthcare settings, academia, research, management and/or policymaking in which your skills and knowledge will be put to great use.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT POTENTIAL CAREER OPTIONS FOR GRADUATES OF THE NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES PROGRAM

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDIES

Professional Resources

Accreditation

The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) is the accrediting body for the Didactic Program in Dietetics, which is the Nutrition and Dietetics option of the Nutritional Sciences major.

The Pennsylvania State University Didactic Program in Dietetics is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics,120 Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312-899-0040, ext 5400.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE ACCREDITATION COUNCIL FOR EDUCATION IN NUTRITION AND DIETETICS

Professional Licensure/Certification

Many U.S. states and territories require professional licensure/certification to be employed. If you plan to pursue employment in a licensed profession after completing this program, please visit the Professional Licensure/Certification Disclosures by State interactive map.

Contact

University Park

DEPARTMENT OF NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES
110 Chandlee Laboratory
University Park, PA 16802
814-863-0806
nutrsci@psu.edu

https://hhd.psu.edu/nutrition/contact/undergraduate-program