Biology, B.S. (Science)

Program Code: BIOL_BS

Entrance Requirements

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Biology major, a student must have:

  1. attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average;
  2. completed BIOL 110, CHEM 110, MATH 140, and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses; and
  3. completed at least one of the following courses with a grade of C or better: BIOL 220W, BIOL 230W, or BIOL 240W.

Degree Requirements

For the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, a minimum of 124 credits is required:

Requirement Credits
General Education 45
Requirements for the Major 94

15 of the 45 credits for General Education are included in the Requirements for the Major. This includes: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses.

General Education

Connecting career and curiosity, the General Education curriculum provides the opportunity for students to acquire transferable skills necessary to be successful in the future and to thrive while living in interconnected contexts. General Education aids students in developing intellectual curiosity, a strengthened ability to think, and a deeper sense of aesthetic appreciation. These are requirements for all baccalaureate students and are often partially incorporated into the requirements of a program. For additional information, see the General Education Requirements section of the Bulletin and consult your academic adviser.

The keystone symbol Keystone/General Education Course appears next to the title of any course that is designated as a General Education course. Program requirements may also satisfy General Education requirements and vary for each program.

Foundations (grade of C or better is required.)

  • Quantification (GQ): 6 credits
  • Writing and Speaking (GWS): 9 credits

Knowledge Domains

  • Arts (GA): 6 credits
  • Health and Wellness (GHW): 3 credits
  • Humanities (GH): 6 credits
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS): 6 credits
  • Natural Sciences (GN): 9 credits

Integrative Studies (may also complete a Knowledge Domain requirement)

  • Inter-Domain or Approved Linked Courses: 6 credits

University Degree Requirements

First Year Engagement

All students enrolled in a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies at University Park, and the World Campus are required to take 1 to 3 credits of the First-Year Seminar, as specified by their college First-Year Engagement Plan.

Other Penn State colleges and campuses may require the First-Year Seminar; colleges and campuses that do not require a First-Year Seminar provide students with a first-year engagement experience.

First-year baccalaureate students entering Penn State should consult their academic adviser for these requirements.

Cultures Requirement    

6 credits are required and may satisfy other requirements

  • United States Cultures: 3 credits
  • International Cultures: 3 credits

Writing Across the Curriculum

3 credits required from the college of graduation and likely prescribed as part of major requirements.

Total Minimum Credits

A minimum of 120 degree credits must be earned for a baccalaureate degree. The requirements for some programs may exceed 120 credits. Students should consult with their college or department adviser for information on specific credit requirements.

Quality of Work

Candidates must complete the degree requirements for their major and earn at least a 2.00 grade-point average for all courses completed within their degree program.

Limitations on Source and Time for Credit Acquisition

The college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. Credit used toward degree programs may need to be earned from a particular source or within time constraints (see Senate Policy 83-80). For more information, check the Suggested Academic Plan for your intended program.

Requirements for the Major

To graduate, a student enrolled in the major must earn a grade of C or better in each course designated by the major as a C-required course, as specified by Senate Policy 82-44.

Common Requirements for the Major (All Options)

Prescribed Courses
CHEM 111Experimental Chemistry I Keystone/General Education Course1
CHEM 113Experimental Chemistry II Keystone/General Education Course1
MATH 141Calculus with Analytic Geometry II Keystone/General Education Course4
Prescribed Courses: Require a grade of C or better
BIOL 110Biology: Basic Concepts and Biodiversity Keystone/General Education Course4
BIOL 220WBiology: Populations and Communities Keystone/General Education Course4
BIOL 230WBiology: Molecules and Cells Keystone/General Education Course4
BIOL 240WBiology: Function and Development of Organisms Keystone/General Education Course4
CHEM 110Chemical Principles I Keystone/General Education Course3
CHEM 112Chemical Principles II Keystone/General Education Course3
MATH 140Calculus With Analytic Geometry I Keystone/General Education Course4
Additional Courses
Select one of the following:8-12
General Physics: Mechanics Keystone/General Education Course
and General Physics: Electricity and Magnetism Keystone/General Education Course
and General Physics: Fluids and Thermal Physics Keystone/General Education Course
and General Physics: Wave Motion and Quantum Physics Keystone/General Education Course
Introductory Physics I Keystone/General Education Course
and Introductory Physics II Keystone/General Education Course
Select one of the following:3-4
Elementary Statistics Keystone/General Education Course
Introduction to Biometry Keystone/General Education Course
Introduction to Biostatistics Keystone/General Education Course
Requirements for the Option
Select an option46-51

Requirements for the Option

Ecology Option (46-51 credits)

Available at the following campuses: Altoona, Schuylkill, University Park

Prescribed Courses
BIOL 463General Ecology3
Additional Courses
STAT 462Applied Regression Analysis3
or STAT 464 Applied Nonparametric Statistics
Select one of the following:6-8
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry I
and Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry II
and Laboratory in Organic Chemistry
Groups
Select a minimum of 15 credits of 400-level biology courses, with at least 6 credits from the Ecology group, 3 credits from the Evolution group, and 3 credits from the Practicum group. A maximum of 3 credits of BIOL 400, 494, 495, 496, and SC 295, 395, 495 may be used to fulfill 15 credits minimum in the 400-level biology course requirements.15
Ecology Group:
Symbiosis
Ecology of Infectious Diseases
Ecotoxicology
Invertebrate Zoology
Ecological and Environmental Problem Solving
Biology of Fungi
Animal Behavior
Ecology of Lakes and Streams
Population Ecology and Global Climate Change
Theoretical Population Ecology
Field Ecology
Physiological Ecology
Experimental Field Biology
Sociobiology
Astrobiology
Coastal Biology
Tropical Field Ecology
Evolution Group:
Molecular Evolution
Symbiosis
Medical Embryology
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Paleobotany
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution
Population Genetics
Animal Behavior
Developmental Genetics
Evolution of Vertebrates
Pathobiology of Emerging Infectious Disease
Population Ecology and Global Climate Change
Theoretical Population Ecology
Practical Bioinformatics
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Physiological Ecology
Biology of RNA
Human Genetics
General Ecology
Sociobiology
Astrobiology
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Practicum Group:
Teaching in Biology
Biological Experimental Design
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Ecological and Environmental Problem Solving
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution of Vertebrates
Histology
Practical Bioinformatics
Field Ecology
Experimental Field Biology
Contemporary Issues in Science and Medicine
Laboratory in Mammalian Physiology
BIOL 475N
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Coastal Biology
Research Project
Internship in Biology
Independent Studies
Tropical Field Ecology
Plant Tissue Culture and Biotechnology
Science Co-op Work Experience I
Science Co-op Work Experience II
Science Co-op Work Experience III
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 17-24 credits from department list17-24
General Biology Option (46-51 credits)

Available at the following campuses: Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, Harrisburg, Schuylkill, Scranton, University Park, York

Additional Courses
Select one of the following:6-8
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry I
and Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry II
and Laboratory in Organic Chemistry
Groups
Select a minimum of 18 credits of 400-level biology courses, with at least 3 credits from each of the following groups (each course may be used to satisfy a requirement in only one group). Moreover, a maximum of 3 credits of BIOL 400, 494, 495, 496 and SC 295, 395, 495 may be used to fulfill the 18 credit minimum in the 400-level biology course requirements.18
Plant and Fungi Group:
Symbiosis
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Paleobotany
Seeds of Change: The Uses of Plants
Biology of Fungi
Reproductive Biology
Plant Physiology
Field Ecology
Physiological Ecology
Ecology of Plant Reproduction
Biology of RNA
Coastal Biology
Tropical Field Ecology
Mycotoxins: Effects of Fungal Toxins on Human and Animal Health
Evolution Group:
Molecular Evolution
Symbiosis
Medical Embryology
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Paleobotany
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution
Population Genetics
Animal Behavior
Developmental Genetics
Evolution of Vertebrates
Pathobiology of Emerging Infectious Disease
Population Ecology and Global Climate Change
Theoretical Population Ecology
Practical Bioinformatics
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Physiological Ecology
Biology of RNA
Human Genetics
General Ecology
Sociobiology
Astrobiology
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Genetics and Developmental Biology Group:
Cellular Mechanisms in Vertebrate Physiology
Molecular Evolution
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Medical Embryology
Cell Signaling and Regulation
Biology of Cancer
Advanced Genetics
Developmental Neurobiology
Population Genetics
Developmental Biology
Reproductive Biology
Developmental Genetics
Practical Bioinformatics
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Ecology of Plant Reproduction
Biology of RNA
Human Genetics
Molecular Basis of Neurological Diseases
Neurobiology
Principles of Immunology
Ecology Group:
Symbiosis
Ecology of Infectious Diseases
Ecotoxicology
Invertebrate Zoology
Ecological and Environmental Problem Solving
Biology of Fungi
Animal Behavior
Ecology of Lakes and Streams
Population Ecology and Global Climate Change
Theoretical Population Ecology
Field Ecology
Physiological Ecology
Experimental Field Biology
General Ecology
Sociobiology
Astrobiology
Coastal Biology
Tropical Field Ecology
Physiology Group:
Cellular Mechanisms in Vertebrate Physiology
Symbiosis
Biology of Aging
Medical Embryology
Ecology of Infectious Diseases
Cell Signaling and Regulation
Ecotoxicology
Biology of Cancer
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Seeds of Change: The Uses of Plants
Developmental Neurobiology
Developmental Biology
Reproductive Biology
Developmental Genetics
Histology
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Physiological Ecology
Human Genetics
Neurobiology
Functional and Integrative Neuroscience
Mammalian Physiology
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
General Endocrinology
Coastal Biology
Practicum Group:
Teaching in Biology
Biological Experimental Design
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Ecological and Environmental Problem Solving
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution of Vertebrates
Histology
Practical Bioinformatics
Field Ecology
Experimental Field Biology
Contemporary Issues in Science and Medicine
Laboratory in Mammalian Physiology
BIOL 475N
Advanced Human Anatomy - cadaver based
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Coastal Biology
Research Project
Internship in Biology
Independent Studies
Tropical Field Ecology
Plant Tissue Culture and Biotechnology
Science Co-op Work Experience I
Science Co-op Work Experience II
Science Co-op Work Experience III
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 20-27 credits from department list20-27
Genetics and Developmental Biology Option (46-51 credits)

Available at the following campuses: Abington, Berks, Harrisburg, Schuylkill, University Park, York

Prescribed Courses
BIOL 322Genetic Analysis3
BIOL 430Developmental Biology3
BMB 401General Biochemistry3
BMB 402General Biochemistry3
CHEM 210Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 212Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 213Laboratory in Organic Chemistry2
Additional Courses
Select 2-5 credits from the following:2-5
Matrices Keystone/General Education Course
Calculus of Several Variables
Introductory Microbiology
Introductory Microbiology Laboratory
Groups
Select a minimum of 12 credits of 400-level courses, with at least 6 credits from the Genetics and Developmental Biology group, 3 credits from Evolution, and 3 credits from the Practicum group. A maximum of 3 credits of BIOL 400, 494, 495, 496 and SC 295, 395, 495 may be used to fulfill the 12 credit minimum in the 400-level biology course requirements.12
Genetics and Developmental Biology Group:
Cellular Mechanisms in Vertebrate Physiology
Molecular Evolution
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Medical Embryology
Cell Signaling and Regulation
Biology of Cancer
Advanced Genetics
Developmental Neurobiology
Population Genetics
Reproductive Biology
Developmental Genetics
Practical Bioinformatics
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Ecology of Plant Reproduction
Biology of RNA
Human Genetics
Molecular Basis of Neurological Diseases
Neurobiology
Molecular Biology of the Gene
Microbial/Molecular Genetics
Molecular Medicine
Functional Genomics
Plant Breeding
Principles of Immunology
Evolution Group:
Molecular Evolution
Symbiosis
Medical Embryology
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Paleobotany
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution
Population Genetics
Animal Behavior
Developmental Genetics
Evolution of Vertebrates
Pathobiology of Emerging Infectious Disease
Population Ecology and Global Climate Change
Theoretical Population Ecology
Practical Bioinformatics
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Physiological Ecology
Biology of RNA
Human Genetics
General Ecology
Sociobiology
Astrobiology
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Practicum Group:
Teaching in Biology
Biological Experimental Design
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Ecological and Environmental Problem Solving
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution of Vertebrates
Histology
Practical Bioinformatics
Field Ecology
Experimental Field Biology
Contemporary Issues in Science and Medicine
Laboratory in Mammalian Physiology
BIOL 475N
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Coastal Biology
Research Project
Internship in Biology
Independent Studies
Tropical Field Ecology
Science Co-op Work Experience I
Science Co-op Work Experience II
Science Co-op Work Experience III
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 9-17 credits from department list9-17
Neuroscience Option (46-51 credits)

Available at the following campuses: University Park

Prescribed Courses
BIOL 469Neurobiology3
BMB 401General Biochemistry3
BMB 402General Biochemistry3
CHEM 210Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 212Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 213Laboratory in Organic Chemistry2
Additional Courses
Select 3 credits from the following:3
Developmental Neurobiology
Functional and Integrative Neuroscience
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Groups
Select a minimum of 12 credits of 400-level biology courses, with at least 6 credits from the Neuroscience group, 3 credits from the Evolution group, and 3 credits from the Practicum Group. A maximum of 3 credits of BIOL 400, 494, 495, 496 and SC 295, 395, 495 may be used to fulfill the 12 credit minimum in the 400-level biology course requirements.12
Neuroscience Group:
Cellular Mechanisms in Vertebrate Physiology
Cell Signaling and Regulation
Seeds of Change: The Uses of Plants
Developmental Neurobiology
Developmental Biology
Histology
Molecular Basis of Neurological Diseases
Functional and Integrative Neuroscience
Mammalian Physiology
Laboratory in Mammalian Physiology
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
General Endocrinology
Biobehavioral Aspects of Stress
Pharmacological Influences on Health
Neuroanatomical Bases for Disorders of Behavior and Health
or HDFS 468
Energy and Macronutrient Metabolism
Learning and Memory
Physiological Psychology
Clinical Neuropsychology
Evolution Group:
Molecular Evolution
Symbiosis
Medical Embryology
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Paleobotany
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution
Population Genetics
Animal Behavior
Developmental Genetics
Evolution of Vertebrates
Pathobiology of Emerging Infectious Disease
Population Ecology and Global Climate Change
Theoretical Population Ecology
Practical Bioinformatics
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Physiological Ecology
Biology of RNA
Human Genetics
General Ecology
Sociobiology
Astrobiology
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Practicum Group:
Teaching in Biology
Biological Experimental Design
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Ecological and Environmental Problem Solving
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution of Vertebrates
Histology
Practical Bioinformatics
Field Ecology
Experimental Field Biology
Contemporary Issues in Science and Medicine
Laboratory in Mammalian Physiology
BIOL 475N
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Coastal Biology
Research Project
Internship in Biology
Independent Studies
Tropical Field Ecology
Plant Tissue Culture and Biotechnology
Science Co-op Work Experience I
Science Co-op Work Experience II
Science Co-op Work Experience III
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 14-19 credits from department list14-19
Plant Biology Option (46-51 credits)

Available at the following campuses: University Park

Prescribed Courses
BIOL 407Plant Developmental Anatomy3
BIOL 441Plant Physiology3
BMB 401General Biochemistry3
BMB 402General Biochemistry3
CHEM 210Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 212Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 213Laboratory in Organic Chemistry2
Additional Courses
Groups
Select a minimum of 12 credits of 400-level biology courses, with at least 6 credits from the Plant and Fungi group, 3 credits from the Evolution group, and 3 credits from the Practicum group. A maximum of 3 credits of BIOL 400, 494, 495, 496 and SC 295, 395, 495 may be used to fulfill the 12 credit minimum in the 400-level biology course requirements.12
Plant and Fungi Group:
Symbiosis
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Paleobotany
Seeds of Change: The Uses of Plants
Biology of Fungi
Reproductive Biology
Field Ecology
Physiological Ecology
Ecology of Plant Reproduction
Biology of RNA
Coastal Biology
Tropical Field Ecology
Evolution Group:
Molecular Evolution
Symbiosis
Medical Embryology
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Paleobotany
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution
Population Genetics
Animal Behavior
Developmental Genetics
Evolution of Vertebrates
Pathobiology of Emerging Infectious Disease
Population Ecology and Global Climate Change
Theoretical Population Ecology
Practical Bioinformatics
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Physiological Ecology
Biology of RNA
Human Genetics
General Ecology
Sociobiology
Astrobiology
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Practicum Group:
Teaching in Biology
Biological Experimental Design
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Ecological and Environmental Problem Solving
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution of Vertebrates
Histology
Practical Bioinformatics
Field Ecology
Experimental Field Biology
Contemporary Issues in Science and Medicine
Laboratory in Mammalian Physiology
BIOL 475N
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Coastal Biology
Research Project
Internship in Biology
Independent Studies
Tropical Field Ecology
Plant Tissue Culture and Biotechnology
Science Co-op Work Experience I
Science Co-op Work Experience II
Science Co-op Work Experience III
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 14-19 credits from department list14-19
Vertebrate Physiology Option (46-51 credits)

Available at the following campuses: Abington, Altoona, Brandywine, Schuylkill, University Park

Prescribed Courses
BIOL 472Mammalian Physiology3
BIOL 473Laboratory in Mammalian Physiology2
BMB 401General Biochemistry3
BMB 402General Biochemistry3
CHEM 210Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 212Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 213Laboratory in Organic Chemistry2
Additional Courses
Groups
Select a minimum of 12 credits of 400-level courses, with at least 6 credits from the Physiology group, 3 credits from the Evolution group, and 3 credits from the Practicum group. A maximum of 3 credits of BIOL 400, 494, 495, 496 and SC 295, 395, 495 may be used to fulfill the 12 credit minimum in the 400-level biology course requirements.12
Physiology Group:
Cellular Mechanisms in Vertebrate Physiology
Symbiosis
Biology of Aging
Medical Embryology
Ecology of Infectious Diseases
Cell Signaling and Regulation
Ecotoxicology
Biology of Cancer
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Seeds of Change: The Uses of Plants
Developmental Neurobiology
Developmental Biology
Reproductive Biology
Developmental Genetics
Histology
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Physiological Ecology
Human Genetics
Neurobiology
Functional and Integrative Neuroscience
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
General Endocrinology
Coastal Biology
Physiology of Animal Reproduction
The Skull
Functional Genomics
Biology of Animal Parasites
Microbial Physiology and Structure
Principles of Immunology
Medical Microbiology
Viral Pathogensis
Physiological Psychology
Evolution Group:
Molecular Evolution
Symbiosis
Medical Embryology
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Paleobotany
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution
Population Genetics
Animal Behavior
Developmental Genetics
Evolution of Vertebrates
Pathobiology of Emerging Infectious Disease
Population Ecology and Global Climate Change
Theoretical Population Ecology
Practical Bioinformatics
Evo-devo: Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms
Physiological Ecology
Biology of RNA
Human Genetics
General Ecology
Sociobiology
Astrobiology
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Practicum Group:
Teaching in Biology
Biological Experimental Design
Plant Developmental Anatomy
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Invertebrate Zoology
Ecological and Environmental Problem Solving
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Advanced Genetics
Biology of Fungi
Evolution of Vertebrates
Histology
Practical Bioinformatics
Field Ecology
Ecology of Plant Reproduction
Experimental Field Biology
Contemporary Issues in Science and Medicine
Laboratory in Mammalian Physiology
BIOL 475N
Advanced Human Anatomy - cadaver based
COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Coastal Biology
Research Project
Internship in Biology
Independent Studies
Tropical Field Ecology
Plant Tissue Culture and Biotechnology
Science Co-op Work Experience I
Science Co-op Work Experience II
Science Co-op Work Experience III
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 15-20 credits from department list15-20

Integrated B.S. in Biology and M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction

Available at the following campuses: University Park

Requirements for the Integrated B.S. in Biology and M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction can be found in the Graduate Bulletin.

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. KEY LITERACIES: describe how heritable changes can lead to differences in populations over time that might result in speciation; trace energy/matter transformation, storage, and mobilization; explain how information is exchanged and stored; recognize how changes in biological structures can have varying effects on function; and/or describe the interactions and interconnections among systems across biological scales and over evolutionary time scales

  2. PROCESS OF SCIENCE: apply the elements of the process of science such as posing questions, generating novel hypotheses based on the scientific literature; developing appropriate technical skills for research; designing/conducting experiments to test hypotheses in laboratory and/or field settings; summarizing/interpreting data; integrating/evaluating findings in the broader scientific field to construct new knowledge; and/or participating in the peer review/revision process

  3. SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE EVALUATION: discriminate among scientific claims presented in a variety of sources based on the strength of evidence; find appropriate published scientific literature; and/or analyze and critically evaluate data/conclusions from the scientific peer-reviewed literature

  4. QUANTITATIVE REASONING AND DATA SCIENCE: apply basic quantitative competencies such as algebra, probability, statistics, unit conversions, and fundamental biological equations; organize, summarize, and interpret quantitative data; use modeling/simulation to approach problems from across various scales; and/or find and analyze large databases using statistical methods and/or other approaches

  5. INTERDISCIPLINARY THINKING: integrate knowledge among biological subfields and between biology and other disciplines

  6. COLLABORATION AND COMMUNICATION: engage with diverse communities and leverage the skills in the community to pose and solve biological questions; demonstrate the ability to work in teams to solve biological problems; and/or communicate in a variety of formal and informal ways in the discussion of biological research

  7. SCIENCE AND SOCIETY: explore the impacts of scientific research on society and the environment and how society influences/relies on research to inform decision-making; evaluate the ethical implications of biological research; recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings; and/or describe how different perspectives and the resulting alternative approaches  might be evaluated using ethical principles to identify a solution to an issue

  8. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES: communicate in a professional manner and learn/use professional behaviors in all aspects of college and career building activities, including participation in opportunities such as research, internships, cooperative education, teaching and tutoring, study abroad, and/or volunteer work

Academic Advising

The objectives of the university’s academic advising program are to help advisees identify and achieve their academic goals, to promote their intellectual discovery, and to encourage students to take advantage of both in-and out-of class educational opportunities in order that they become self-directed learners and decision makers.

Both advisers and advisees share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed. By encouraging their advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning, advisers assume a significant educational role. The advisee’s unit of enrollment will provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser, the information needed to plan the chosen program of study, and referrals to other specialized resources.

READ SENATE POLICY 32-00: ADVISING POLICY

University Park

Barbara DeHart
Director, Undergraduate Biology Advising
227 Ritenour Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-865-2329
psubioadvising@psu.edu

Abington

Eric Ingersoll
Program Chair
1600 Woodland Road
Abington, PA 19001
215-881-7492
epi1@psu.edu

Altoona

Corien Bakermans
Professor of Microbiology
Hawthorn Building 204
3000 Ivyside Park
Altoona, PA 16601
814-940-3313
cub21@psu.edu

Beaver

Cassandra Miller-Butterworth
Associate Professor of Biology
100 University Drive
Monaca, PA 15061
724-773-3527
cmm48@psu.edu

Berks

Maureen Dunbar
Program Coordinator, Associate Professor
Luerssen 101H
Reading, PA 19610
640-396-6328
med18@psu.edu

Brandywine

Mark Boudreau
Biology Coordinator
25 Yearsley Mill Rd
Media, PA 19063
610-892-1268
mab90@psu.edu

Harrisburg

Sairam V. Rudrabhatla, Ph.D.
Program Chair
Science and Technology Building, TL 174
Middletown, PA 17057
717-948-6560
svr11@psu.edu

Schuylkill

Lucas Redmond
Program Coordinator, Biology
C-001 200 University Drive
Schuylkill Haven, PA 17972
570-385-6167
ljr5322@psu.edu

Scranton

Agnes Kim
Associate Professor of Physics
Dawson Building 212C
Dunmore, PA 18512
570-963-2549
axk55@psu.edu

York

Anne Vardo-Zalik
Associate Professor of Biology
1 Elias Science Building
York, PA 17403
717-718-6705
amv12@psu.edu

Suggested Academic Plan

The suggested academic plan(s) listed on this page are the plan(s) that are in effect during the 2020-21 academic year. To access previous years' suggested academic plans, please visit the archive to view the appropriate Undergraduate Bulletin edition (Note: the archive only contain suggested academic plans beginning with the 2018-19 edition of the Undergraduate Bulletin).

General Biology Option: Biology, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 110*#4BIOL 230W*#4
CHEM 110*#†3CHEM 112*†3
CHEM 1111CHEM 1131
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 153MATH 141B or 141‡†4
MATH 140B or 140*‡#†4General Education Course3
PSU 161 
 16 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 220W*#4BIOL 240W*#4
CHEM 210 or 2023CHEM 212 or 2033
STAT 2503CHEM 213W (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)2
General Education Course3CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic advisor for options)3
 16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
PHYS 250 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)4PHYS 251 (consult with an academic adviserfor alternative options)4
General Education Course3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
ENGL 202C, 202A, 202B, or 202D3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 15 15
Total Credits 124

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Genetics and Development Option: Biology, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 110*#4BIOL 230W*#4
CHEM 110*#†3CHEM 112*†3
CHEM 1111CHEM 1131
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 153MATH 141B or 141‡†4
MATH 140B or 140*‡#†4General Education Course3
PSU 161 
 16 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 220W*#4BIOL 240W*#4
CHEM 2103CHEM 2123
MICRB 201 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)3CHEM 213W2
General Education Course3CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 3223
 16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 4303STAT 2503
BMB 4013BMB 4023
PHYS 250 (consult with and academic adviser for alternative options)4PHYS 251 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)4
General Education Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
ENGL 202A, 202B, or 202C3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 15 15
Total Credits 124

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Neuroscience Option: Biology, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 110*#4BIOL 230W*#4
CHEM 110*#†3CHEM 112*†3
CHEM 1111CHEM 1131
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 153MATH 141B or 141‡†4
MATH 140B or 140*#†4General Education Course3
PSU 161 
 16 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 220W*#4BIOL 240W* 4
CHEM 2103CHEM 2123
STAT 2503CHEM 213W2
General Education Course3CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 469 or BBH 4693BIOL 470 or BBH 4703
BMB 4013BMB 4023
PHYS 250 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)4PHYS 251 (consult with adviser)4
General Education Course3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
ENGL 202C, 202A, 202B, or 202D3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 15 15
Total Credits 124

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Plant Biology Option: Biology, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
BIOL 110*#4BIOL 230W*#4 
CHEM 110*#†3CHEM 112*†3 
CHEM 1111CHEM 1131 
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 153MATH 141B or 141‡†4 
MATH 140B or 140*‡#†4General Education Course3 
PSU 161  
 16 15 
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
BIOL 220W*#4BIOL 240W*#4 
CHEM 2103CHEM 2123 
STAT 2503CHEM 213W2 
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C3 
General Education Course3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3 
 16 15 
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
BIOL 4413BIOL 4073BIOL 4143
BMB 4013BMB 4023 
PHYS 250 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative optoins)4PHYS 251 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)4 
General Education Course3General Education Course3 
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3 
 16 16 3
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3 
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3General Education Course3 
General Education Course3General Education Course3 
ENGL 202C, 202A, 202B, or 202D3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3 
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3  
 15 12 
Total Credits 124

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Vertebrate Physiology Option: Biology, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 110*#4BIOL 230W*#4
CHEM 110*#†3CHEM 112*†3
CHEM 1111CHEM 1131
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 153MATH 141B or 141‡†4
MATH 140B or 140*‡#†4General Education Course3
PSU 161 
 16 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 220W*#4BIOL 240W#4
CHEM 2103CHEM 2123
STAT 2503CHEM 213W2
General Education Course3CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 4723BIOL 4732
BMB 4013BMB 4023
PHYS 250 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)4PHYS 251 (consult with an academic adviser for alterntative options)4
General Education Course3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 15
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
ENGL 202C, 202A, 202B, or 202D3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 Elective Course1
 15 16
Total Credits 124

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Ecology Option: Biology, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 110*#4BIOL 230W*#4
CHEM 110*#†3CHEM 112*†3
CHEM 1111CHEM 1131
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 153MATH 141B or 141‡†4
MATH 140B or 140*‡#†4General Education Course3
PSU 161 
 16 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 220W*#4BIOL 240W*#4
CHEM 202 (or Chem 210)3CHEM 203 (or Chem 212 and Chem 213)3
STAT 2503CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C3
General Education Course3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)2
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
STAT 462 (see adviser for alternatives)3Elective Course3
PHYS 250 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)4PHYS 251 (consult with an academic adviserfor alternative options)4
General Education Course3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
ENGL 202C, 202A, 202B, or 202D3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 15 15
Total Credits 124

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Biology, B.S. at Commonwealth Campuses

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 110*#4BIOL 230W*#4
CHEM 110*#†3CHEM 112*†3
CHEM 1111CHEM 1131
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 153MATH 141B or 141‡†4
MATH 140B or 140*‡#†4General Education Course3
 15 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 220W*#4BIOL 240W*#4
CHEM 210 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)3CHEM 212 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)3
STAT 250 or 200 (consult with adviser for alternative)3CHEM 213W (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)2
General Education Course3CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
PHYS 250 (consult with an academic adviser for alternative options)4PHYS 251 (consult with adviser for alternative)4
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3BIOL 400 Level Selection (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
ENGL 202C, 202A, 202B, or 202D3General Education Course3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)3
Supporting course (consult with an academic adviser for options)1 
 16 15
Total Credits 124

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

Career Paths

A Biology BS degree provides an excellent foundation and the skills required for a wide range of technical careers. While many majors use a Biology degree to prepare for entrance into health professional schools, others follow career paths in research, education, and business. Students also pursue graduate study at universities both across the U.S. and internationally.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT POTENTIAL CAREER OPTIONS FOR GRADUATES OF THE BIOLOGY PROGRAM

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDIES

Contact

University Park

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY
228 Ritenour Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-865-2329
psubioadvising@psu.edu

http://bio.psu.edu/about-us/contact-us

Abington

DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
1600 Woodland Road
Abington, PA 19001
215-881-7300
epi1@psu.edu

http://abington.psu.edu/biology

Altoona

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS AND NATURAL SCIENCES
3000 Ivyside Park
Altoona, PA 16601
814-940-3313
cub21@psu.edu

https://altoona.psu.edu/academics/bachelors-degrees/biology/request-information

Beaver

100 University Drive
Monaca, PA 15061
724-773-3527
cmm48@psu.edu

http://beaver.psu.edu/biology

Berks

DIVISION OF SCIENCE
Luerssen Science Building
Reading, PA 19610
610-396-6328
med18@psu.edu

http://berks.psu.edu/bs-biology

Brandywine

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
25 Yearsley Mill Rd
Media, PA 19063
610-285-1268
mab90@psu.edu

https://brandywine.psu.edu/academics/bachelors-degrees/biology

Harrisburg

SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY
Science & Tech Building, TL 177
Middletown, PA 17057
717-948-4387
mrr53@psu.edu

https://harrisburg.psu.edu/science-engineering-technology/biology-science/bachelor-science-biology

Schuylkill

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
C-001 200 University Drive
Schuylkill Haven, PA 17972
570-385-6167
ljr5322@psu.edu

https://schuylkill.psu.edu/academics/degrees/bacc-degrees/biology

Scranton

BIOLOGY
Dawson Building 212C
Dunmore, PA 18512
570-963-2549
axk55@psu.edu
    
https://scranton.psu.edu/biology-degree

York

1 Elias Science Building
York, PA 17403
717-718-6705
amv12@psu.edu

http://york.psu.edu/academics/baccalaureate/biology