Animal Science

Admission Requirements

Applicants apply for admission to the program via the Graduate School application for admission. Requirements listed here are in addition to Graduate Council policies listed under GCAC-300 Admissions Policies.

Prerequisite to graduate work is the completion of an undergraduate major in animal science, dairy science, poultry science, or a related biological science.

Although not required, applicants are strongly encouraged to take the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE). Students with a 3.00 junior/senior grade-point average (on a 4.00 scale) and with appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission on a competitive basis.

Exceptions to admission requirements may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests.

Degree Requirements

Master of Professional Studies (M.P.S.)

Requirements listed here are in addition to Graduate Council policies listed under GCAC-700 Professional Degree Policies.

A minimum of 30 credits at the 400 or 500 level is required, with a minimum of 18 credits at the 500 level, and at least 6 credits in formal (i.e., non-core) courses in animal agriculture/biological science area at the 500 level. In addition, the following Program core courses (credits) are required:

Required Courses
ANSC 500Foundation Readings in Animal Science1
ANSC 502Scientific Scholarship (Ethics Offering)2
ANSC 590Colloquium2
ANSC 602Supervised Experience in College Teaching1
Culminating Experience
ANSC 596Individual Studies (Scholarly Paper)3

A maximum of 10 credits may be earned in special problem-type courses, which may include up to 3 credits in ANSC 596 for the scholarly paper. The culminating experience for the degree is a scholarly paper completed while the student is enrolled in ANSC 596.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Requirements listed here are in addition to Graduate Council policies listed under GCAC-600 Research Degree Policies.

The academic M.S. program requires a thesis and is designed for those primarily interested in education and research. A minimum of 30 credits at the 400, 500, or 600 level is required, with a minimum of 18 credits at the 500 or 600 level, and at least 12 credits in formal (i.e., non-core) courses in animal agriculture/biological science area with at least 6 of the 12 credits at the 500 level. Students are required to write a thesis, and at least 6 credits in thesis research (ANSC 600 or ANSC 610) must be taken in conjunction with completing the thesis. In addition, the following Program core courses (credits) are required:

Required Courses
ANSC 500Foundation Readings in Animal Science1
ANSC 502Scientific Scholarship (Ethics Offering)2
ANSC 590Colloquium2
ANSC 602Supervised Experience in College Teaching1
Culminating Experience
ANSC 600Thesis Research6
or ANSC 610 Thesis Research Off Campus

The thesis must be accepted by the advisers and/or committee members, the head of the graduate program, and the Graduate School, and the student must pass a thesis defense.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Requirements listed here are in addition to Graduate Council policies listed under GCAC-600 Research Degree Policies.

The academic Ph.D. program requires a dissertation and is designed for those primarily 80 interested in education and research. Official entrance into the Ph.D. program occurs upon successful completion of the qualifying examination. Ph.D. degree requirements include successful completion of the following: approved graduate course work, English Competence requirements, a comprehensive examination, and a final oral examination (the dissertation defense). To earn the Ph.D. degree, doctoral candidates must write a dissertation that is accepted by the Ph.D. committee, the head of the graduate program, and the Graduate School. In addition, the following Program core courses (credits) are required:

Required Courses
ANSC 500Foundation Readings in Animal Science2
ANSC 502Scientific Scholarship (both the Ethics offering and the Grantsmanship offering)4
ANSC 590Colloquium 13
ANSC 602Supervised Experience in College Teaching1

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships available to students in this program and other forms of student aid are described in the Tuition & Funding section of The Graduate School’s website. Students on graduate assistantships must adhere to the course load limits set by The Graduate School.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 699 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Learning outcomes

Master of Science (M.S.)

  1. KNOW. Students will demonstrate appropriate breadth and depth of disciplinary knowledge (e.g., nutrition, physiology, statistics, etc.), a command of the current literature relating to their thesis project, and a thorough understanding of the problems that their research addresses.
  2. APPLY/CREATE. Students will apply current knowledge in their field to design animal studies and/or perform laboratory methods or other techniques to address their research problems, while generating and testing new ideas or hypotheses that provide solutions to those problems.
  3. COMMUNICATE. Students will effectively communicate their research findings, both in writing, via abstracts and manuscripts, and orally, via seminars and oral or poster presentations, to peers, advisors/mentors, and other scholars and/or stakeholders in their specialty field or beyond their discipline.
  4. THINK. Students will be able to conceptualize and critically evaluate the work of others in their field.
  5. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE. Students will be able to identify ethical issues in research, will become familiar with University policies involving the use of animals and human subjects in research, will act ethically and exhibit collegiality with other professionals within or outside of their field, and will engage in service to the profession and to society.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

  1. KNOW. Students will demonstrate appropriate breadth and depth of disciplinary knowledge (e.g., nutrition, physiology, statistics, etc.), a command of the current literature relating to their thesis project, and a thorough understanding of the problems that their research addresses.
  2. APPLY/CREATE. Students will apply current knowledge in their field to design animal studies and/or perform laboratory methods or other techniques to address their research problems, while generating and testing new ideas or hypotheses that provide solutions to those problems.
  3. COMMUNICATE. Students will effectively communicate their research findings, both in writing, via abstracts and manuscripts, and orally, via seminars and oral or poster presentations, to peers, advisors/mentors, and other scholars and/or stakeholders in their specialty field or beyond their discipline.
  4. THINK. Students will be able to conceptualize and critically evaluate the work of others in their field.
  5. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE. Students will be able to identify ethical issues in research, will become familiar with University policies involving the use of animals and human subjects in research, will act ethically and exhibit collegiality with other professionals within or outside of their field, and will engage in service to the profession and to society.

Contact

Campus University Park
Graduate Program Head Terry D Etherton
Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) or Professor-in-Charge (PIC) Robert Glenn Elkin
Program Contact

Molly Martin
335 Ag Science Industries Building
University Park PA 16802
mjf217@psu.edu
(814) 863-3664

Program Website View