Agricultural Systems Management, Minor

Program Code: ASM_UMNR

Program Description

The Agricultural System Management minor covers the mechanical, natural resource, processing, and electronic technologies applied in agriculture systems. Students who graduate with this minor will have a solid understanding of how physical sciences and biological principles apply to real world problems in food and fiber industries. With industry teams often formed purposefully with many disciplines represented, this background of applied engineering basics and the focus on quantitative analysis has proven helpful to past graduates.

Integration of the applied technologies is addressed using a systems approach in each required course. Technologies addressed by courses in this minor include electric motors, mechanical and hydraulic power transmission systems, mobile equipment functions and operations, sensor and control systems. The minor is targeted to students who will use these technologies or manage others who are responsible for systems utilizing these technologies. Most courses required for the minor are taught by engineering faculty, and nearly every course has a laboratory period.

What is Agricultural Systems Management?

The Agricultural System Management minor covers the mechanical, natural resource, processing, and electronic technologies applied in agricultural systems. Students can gain a solid understanding of how physical sciences and biological principles apply to real-world problems in food and fiber industries. With industry teams often being multidisciplinary, graduates have found the basic applied engineering and quantitative analysis covered in this minor to be helpful. Technologies addressed by courses in this minor include combustion engines, electric motors, mechanical and hydraulic power transmission systems, mobile equipment functions and operations, sensor and control systems, irrigation, and drainage. The minor is targeted to students who will use these technologies or manage others who are responsible for systems utilizing these technologies. Most courses required for the minor are taught by engineering faculty, and nearly every course has a laboratory period.

You Might Like This Program If...

  • You are pursuing an engineering or engineering technology major and want to complement it with applications in agriculture, food, and/or the environment.
  • You want to take application-focused classes with interactive labs and hands-on learning opportunities.
  • You are interested in solving problems related to fundamental societal needs, like food, water, fiber, and renewable energy.
  • You are passionate about sustainability and technology.

Entrance to Minor

Admission to the minor requires introductory calculus (MATH 110 or MATH 140) and introductory physics (PHYS 211 or PHYS 250).

Program Requirements

Requirement Credits
Requirements for the Minor 18

Requirements for the Minor

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor, as specified by Senate Policy 59-10. In addition, at least six credits of the minor must be unique from the prescribed courses required by a student's major(s).

Prescribed Courses
Prescribed Courses: Require a grade of C or better
AGRO 28Principles of Crop Management3
ASM 310Power Transmission in Agriculture3
ASM 327Soil and Water Resource Management3
Additional Courses
Additional Courses: Require a grade of C or better
Students must select 6 credits from the following:6
Selection and Management of Agricultural Machinery
Energy Analysis in Biorenewable Systems
Safety and Health in Agriculture and Biorenewable Industries
Electric Power and Instrumentation
Biorenewable Systems Analysis and Management
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Supporting Courses and Related Areas: Require a grade of C or better
Select 3 credits in agricultural or environmental sciences in consultation with the minor adviser3

Academic Advising

The objectives of the university’s academic advising program are to help advisees identify and achieve their academic goals, to promote their intellectual discovery, and to encourage students to take advantage of both in-and out-of class educational opportunities in order that they become self-directed learners and decision makers.

Both advisers and advisees share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed. By encouraging their advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning, advisers assume a significant educational role. The advisee's unit of enrollment will provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser, the information needed to plan the chosen program of study, and referrals to other specialized resources.

READ SENATE POLICY 32-00: ADVISING POLICY

University Park

Jude Liu
Associate Professor
309 Forest Resources Laboratory
University Park, PA 16802
814-863-6844
jliu@psu.edu

Contact

University Park

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
105 Agricultural Engineering Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-863-1524
wjt11@psu.edu

http://abe.psu.edu