Food Systems, Minor

Program Code: FDSYS_UMNR

Program Description

The FDSYS minor will educate and prepare students for existing and emerging food systems careers by designing and delivering an integrative, interdisciplinary Food Systems minor that is learner-centered, experiential and stakeholder-responsive. The minor uses a competency-oriented approach to inform its curriculum, reflective interdisciplinary collaboration, and food systems stakeholder involvement.

Competencies and Guiding Principles of the Food Systems Minor

A comprehensive ecology of knowledge framework emphasizes both what is taught, and how it is taught as mutually supportive components of education. The competencies of the minor are the what: the student learning objectives that graduates of the Food Systems minor are expected to demonstrate proficiency in. The guiding principles of the Food Systems minor are the how: they serve as a roadmap for how the courses and experiences in the minor will support the learning objectives.

Competencies

Students who complete the Food Systems Minor will:

  1. Solve complex problems: Analyze, plan, act on and evaluate solutions across multiple domains of the food system, including health, science, economics and business, community, agriculture, the food service industry, and policy.
  2. Use evidence from multiple ways of knowing (epistemologies) to analyze, select and assess food systems problems and solutions. Different knowledge include scientific, social, cultural, historical, political, indigenous, and local perspectives.
  3. Respect and critically reflect on one's own and others' perspectives and values to understand how these perspectives and values influence food systems decisions.
  4. Be civically engaged both locally and globally to enable positive change in food and agricultural systems.

Guiding Principles

  1. Experiential learning. Courses and related activities will offer students place-based, learning experiences in food systems beyond the classroom, thereby integrating theoretical and practical knowledge. Activities will include engaged scholarship, internships, service learning, research, and other creative and professional work experiences. For example, the required Supervised Field Engagement Experience will provide opportunity for personalized work on food systems related topics, practice in stakeholder engagement, and network-building for students with potential future employers.
  2. Interdisciplinary problems and project-based learning. Problem-based learning, experiential and stakeholder-driven projects, and systems-oriented inquiry have been linked to positive student appraisal of competency development for individual courses (Galt et al. 2013). Courses and related experiences will incorporate pedagogies and curricula that emphasize students' engagement with interdisciplinary food system problem-posing (inquiry) and project-based learning, thereby placing students at the center of their learning.
  3. Community partnerships and engagement. Courses and related experiences will advance students' and community partners' knowledge, skills, and dispositions toward forming and maintaining partnerships in service towards food systems security and mutually beneficial community, health, and environmental sustainability goals.
  4. Personal transformation through reflection. Courses and related experiences will provide opportunities for students, instructors, and allied partners to reflect (individually and collectively) upon their learning about a wide range of issues associated with environmental sustainability, economic development and community prosperity, justice and well-being with an intention to articulate change in one's own understandings.
  5. Collaboration and deliberation. Courses and related experiences will promote among students, instructors and allied partners opportunities to develop knowledge, skills and dispositions inherent to democratic/civic participation.
  6. Career stakeholder engagement. Courses and related experiences will engage food systems stakeholders and prospective employers from government, industry and non-profit sectors. By assessing stakeholders' understandings of critical competencies for successful food systems work, Food Systems minor graduates will be better prepared to address current food system challenges and also achieve their personal and professional goals.

Program Requirements

Requirement Credits
Requirements for the Minor 18-19

Requirements for the Minor

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor, as specified by Senate Policy 59-10. In addition, at least six credits of the minor must be unique from the prescribed courses required by a student's major(s).

Prescribed Courses
Prescribed Courses: Require a grade of C or better
AGBM 170Investigating the U.S. Food System: How food moves from field to table Keystone/General Education Course3
FDSYS 490From Agriculture to Culture: Perspectives on your food from seed to plate1
FDSYS 495Internship2-3
Additional Courses
Additional Courses: Require a grade of C or better
Select 3 credits each from two of the three topic areas. At least one selected additional course should be at the 400-level:6
Topic Area: Agricultural and Environmental Sciences:
Sustainable Agriculture Science and Policy Keystone/General Education Course
Principles of Integrated Pest Management
Principles of Crop Management
Introduction to Animal Industries Keystone/General Education Course
Topic Area: Food, Nutrition and Health:
Introductory Food Science
Nutrition Applications for a Healthy Lifestyle Keystone/General Education Course
NUTR 175
Keystone/General Education Course
Introductory Principles of Nutrition Keystone/General Education Course
The Sustainable Fork: Food Systems Decisions for Away-From-Home Eating
Topic Area: Human and Social Dimensions:
Changing Food Systems: Comparative Perspectives
Food, Farms & Justice: What's Education Got To Do With Them? Keystone/General Education Course
Food and the Future Environment Keystone/General Education Course
Introduction to U.S. Food History Keystone/General Education Course
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Supporting Courses and Related Areas: Require a grade of C or better
Select 6 credits from approved list in consultation with the minor adviser. At least 3 of the credits must be from the topic area not selected under Additional Courses. The following courses are recommended for meeting the requirements of the minor. Students may substitute courses to meet this requirement in consultation with the minor adviser.6
Agricultural and Environmental Sciences:
Sustainable Agriculture Science and Policy Keystone/General Education Course
Principles and Practices of Organic Agriculture Keystone/General Education Course
Introductory Agroecology
Nutrient Management in Agricultural Systems
Principles of Integrated Pest Management
Principles of Crop Management
Forage Crop Management
Field Crop Management
Introduction to Animal Industries Keystone/General Education Course
Animal Science
Animal Products Technology
Animal Products Technology Laboratory
ENT 222
Environmental Factors and Their Effect on Your Food Supply Keystone/General Education Course
Horticultural Science Keystone/General Education Course
Small Fruit Culture
Deciduous Tree Fruits
Vegetable Crops
Tropical Agriculture and Food Systems
Gardening for Fun and Profit Keystone/General Education Course
The Fungal Jungle: A Mycological Safari From Truffles to Slime Molds Keystone/General Education Course
Mushroom Cultivation
Horticultural Crop Diseases Keystone/General Education Course
Introductory Soil Science Keystone/General Education Course
Soil Nutrient Behavior and Management
Soil Ecology
Natural Resources Conservation and Community Sustainability
Food, Nutrition, and Health:
Strategies for Addressing the Obesity and Diabetes Epidemics Keystone/General Education Course
Food Facts and Fads Keystone/General Education Course
Introductory Food Science
Physiology of Nutrition
International Food Production
Institutional Food Service Management
HM 329
Food Production and Service Management
The Sustainable Fork: Food Systems Decisions for Away-From-Home Eating
New Product Development for Commercial Foodservice
Advanced Food Production and Service Management
Nutrition Applications for a Healthy Lifestyle Keystone/General Education Course
Elementary Foods
Healthy Food for All: Factors that Influence What we Eat in the US - LINKED Keystone/General Education Course
Community and Public Health Nutrition
Biocultural Perspectives on Public Health Nutrition
Global Nutrition Problems: Health, Science, and Ethics
Human and Social Dimensions:
Introduction into Ethics and Issues in Agriculture Keystone/General Education Course
Economics of the Food System
Food Product Marketing
Managing the Food System
First Farmers Keystone/General Education Course
Anthropology of Alcohol Keystone/General Education Course
Hunters and Gatherers
Anthropology of Food Honors Keystone/General Education Course
Food, Farms & Justice: What's Education Got To Do With Them? Keystone/General Education Course
Science, Technology and Public Policy Keystone/General Education Course
Changing Food Systems: Comparative Perspectives
Exploring the Literature of Food: Current Trends in American Food Writing and Environmentalism Keystone/General Education Course
Food and the Future Environment Keystone/General Education Course
Introduction to U.S. Food History Keystone/General Education Course
The Consumer Revolution
Plants in the Human Context Keystone/General Education Course
INTAG 100
Jews and Food

Academic Advising

The objectives of the university’s academic advising program are to help advisees identify and achieve their academic goals, to promote their intellectual discovery, and to encourage students to take advantage of both in-and out-of class educational opportunities in order that they become self-directed learners and decision makers.

Both advisers and advisees share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed. By encouraging their advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning, advisers assume a significant educational role. The advisee's unit of enrollment will provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser, the information needed to plan the chosen program of study, and referrals to other specialized resources.

READ SENATE POLICY 32-00: ADVISING POLICY

University Park

Clare Hinrichs
Professor of Rural Sociology
111-D Armsby Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-863-8628
chinrichs@psu.edu

Contact

University Park

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, SOCIOLOGY, AND EDUCATION
201 Armsby Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-865-0467
chinrichs@psu.edu