Wildlife and Fisheries Science, B.S.

Program Code: WFS_BS

Entrance to Major

In order to be eligible for entrance to this major, a student must:

  1. attain at least a C (2.00) cumulative grade-point average for all courses taken at the University; and
  2. have third-semester classification.

READ SENATE POLICY 37-30: ENTRANCE TO AND CHANGES IN MAJOR PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Degree Requirements

For the Bachelor of Science in Wildlife and Fisheries Science, a minimum of 120 credits is required for the Wildlife option and a minimum of 122 credits is required for the Fisheries option:

Requirement Credits
General Education 45
Electives 3-9
Requirements for the Major 87-95

21 of the 45 credits for General Education are included in the Requirements for the Major. This includes: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.

General Education

Connecting career and curiosity, the General Education curriculum provides the opportunity for students to acquire transferable skills necessary to be successful in the future and to thrive while living in interconnected contexts. General Education aids students in developing intellectual curiosity, a strengthened ability to think, and a deeper sense of aesthetic appreciation. These are requirements for all baccalaureate students and are often partially incorporated into the requirements of a program. For additional information, see the General Education Requirements section of the Bulletin and consult your academic adviser.

The keystone symbol Keystone/General Education Course appears next to the title of any course that is designated as a General Education course. Program requirements may also satisfy General Education requirements and vary for each program.

Foundations (grade of C or better is required.)

  • Quantification (GQ): 6 credits
  • Writing and Speaking (GWS): 9 credits

Knowledge Domains

  • Arts (GA): 6 credits
  • Health and Wellness (GHW): 3 credits
  • Humanities (GH): 6 credits
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS): 6 credits
  • Natural Sciences (GN): 9 credits

Integrative Studies (may also complete a Knowledge Domain requirement)

  • Inter-Domain or Approved Linked Courses: 6 credits

University Degree Requirements

First Year Engagement

All students enrolled in a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies at University Park, and the World Campus are required to take 1 to 3 credits of the First-Year Seminar, as specified by their college First-Year Engagement Plan.

Other Penn State colleges and campuses may require the First-Year Seminar; colleges and campuses that do not require a First-Year Seminar provide students with a first-year engagement experience.

First-year baccalaureate students entering Penn State should consult their academic adviser for these requirements.

Cultures Requirement    

6 credits are required and may satisfy other requirements

  • United States Cultures: 3 credits
  • International Cultures: 3 credits

Writing Across the Curriculum

3 credits required from the college of graduation and likely prescribed as part of major requirements.

Total Minimum Credits

A minimum of 120 degree credits must be earned for a baccalaureate degree. The requirements for some programs may exceed 120 credits. Students should consult with their college or department adviser for information on specific credit requirements.

Quality of Work

Candidates must complete the degree requirements for their major and earn at least a 2.00 grade-point average for all courses completed within their degree program.

Limitations on Source and Time for Credit Acquisition

The college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. Credit used toward degree programs may need to be earned from a particular source or within time constraints (see Senate Policy 83-80). For more information, check the Suggested Academic Plan for your intended program.

Requirements for the Major

To graduate, a student enrolled in the major must earn a grade of C or better in each course designated by the major as a C-required course, as specified by Senate Policy 82-44.

Common Requirements for the Major (All Options)

Prescribed Courses
BIOL 110Biology: Basic Concepts and Biodiversity Keystone/General Education Course4
BIOL 240WBiology: Function and Development of Organisms Keystone/General Education Course4
CHEM 110Chemical Principles I Keystone/General Education Course3
CHEM 111Experimental Chemistry I Keystone/General Education Course1
CHEM 202Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry I3
ECON 104Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy Keystone/General Education Course3
ENGL 202CEffective Writing: Technical Writing Keystone/General Education Course3
PHYS 250Introductory Physics I Keystone/General Education Course4
SOILS 101Introductory Soil Science Keystone/General Education Course3
WFS 446Wildlife and Fisheries Population Dynamics3
Prescribed Courses: Require a grade of C or better
BIOL 220WBiology: Populations and Communities Keystone/General Education Course4
WFS 209NWildlife and Fisheries Conservation Keystone/General Education Course3
WFS 300The Vertebrates2
WFS 301Vertebrate Laboratory2
WFS 310Wildlife and Fisheries Measurements3
Additional Courses
FOR 350Forest Ecosystem Monitoring and Data Analysis3
or STAT 460 Intermediate Applied Statistics
MATH 111Techniques of Calculus II Keystone/General Education Course2-4
or MATH 141 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II Keystone/General Education Course
STAT 240Introduction to Biometry Keystone/General Education Course3
or STAT 301 Statistical Analysis I Keystone/General Education Course
Select 3-4 credits of the following:3-4
Animal Genetics and Selection
Genetics and Evolution of the Human Species Keystone/General Education Course
Genetics
Biology: Molecules and Cells Keystone/General Education Course
Select 3 credits of the following:3
Communication Methods and Media
Science Writing
Advanced Technical Writing and Editing
Additional Courses: Require a grade of C or better
MATH 110Techniques of Calculus I Keystone/General Education Course4
or MATH 140 Calculus With Analytic Geometry I Keystone/General Education Course
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 6 credits in natural resource economics, policy, planning, law, administration, or human dimensions from departmental list6
Requirements for the Option
Select an option18-23

Requirements for the Option

Fisheries Option (22-23 credits)
Prescribed Courses
WFS 410General Fishery Science3
WFS 452Ichthyology2
WFS 453Ichthyology Laboratory2
WFS 463WFishery Management3
Additional Courses
Select 3-4 credits of the following:3-4
Animal Science
Introduction to Human Physiology Keystone/General Education Course
and Physiology Laboratory
Physiological Ecology
Select 3 credits of the following:3
Ornithology
Mammalogy
Wildlife Management
Select 3 credits of the following:3
Freshwater Entomology
Watershed Management
Ecology of Fishes
Limnology
Select 3 credits of the following:3
Mapping Our Changing World Keystone/General Education Course
Geographic Information Systems
Introduction to Environmental Geology
Geomorphology
Water Resources Geochemistry
Marine Geology
Hydrogeology
Wildlife Option (18-19 credits)
Prescribed Courses
FOR 203Field Dendrology3
WFS 407Ornithology3
WFS 408Mammalogy3
WFS 447WWildlife Management3
Additional Courses
WFS 406Ornithology Laboratory2
or WFS 409 Mammalogy Laboratory
Select 2-3 credits of the following:2-3
General Fishery Science
Ecology of Fishes
Ichthyology
Ichthyology Laboratory
Fishery Management
Select 3 credits of the following:3
Taxonomy of Seed Plants
Forest Ecology
Horticultural Science Keystone/General Education Course
Ornamental Plant Materials
Plant Ecology

Program Learning Objectives

  1. Students will be able to evaluate the potential population level effect of alternative management actions based on development of appropriate population dynamics models; for example, students might explore the effect of supplementing an endangered species or the effect of different harvest regulations on a game species.
  2. Students will be able to identify wildlife and fish species and quantify relevant attributes of their life history and critical habitat.
  3. Students will have the ability to select and use appropriate techniques for a given purpose such as selection of field samples, observation of biota in the field or lab, measurement of habitat attributes, and analysis of data.

Academic Advising

The objectives of the university’s academic advising program are to help advisees identify and achieve their academic goals, to promote their intellectual discovery, and to encourage students to take advantage of both in-and out-of class educational opportunities in order that they become self-directed learners and decision makers.

Both advisers and advisees share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed. By encouraging their advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning, advisers assume a significant educational role. The advisee’s unit of enrollment will provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser, the information needed to plan the chosen program of study, and referrals to other specialized resources.

READ SENATE POLICY 32-00: ADVISING POLICY

University Park

Ellen A. Rom
Coordinator of Undergraduate Programs and Alumni Relations
114 Forest Resources Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-863-0362
exr2@psu.edu

Suggested Academic Plan

The suggested academic plan(s) listed on this page are the plan(s) that are in effect during the 2020-21 academic year. To access previous years' suggested academic plans, please visit the archive to view the appropriate Undergraduate Bulletin edition (Note: the archive only contain suggested academic plans beginning with the 2018-19 edition of the Undergraduate Bulletin).

Fisheries Option: Wildlife and Fisheries Science, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 1104CHEM 1103
MATH 110 or 140*‡†4CHEM 1111
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
First-Year Seminar1-3MATH 111 or 1412-4
 WFS 209N*3
 15-17 15-17
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ANSC 201, BIOL 141 and BIOL 142, or BIOL 4463-4PHYS 2504
BIOL 220W*4BIOL 240W4
CHEM 2023CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C‡†3
BIOL 133, 222, 230W, or ANSC 3223-4SOILS 1013
STAT 240 or 301‡†3General Education Course 3
 16-18 17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
WFS 300*2FOR 350 or STAT 4603
WFS 301*2ENT 425, FOR 470, WFS 422, or WFS 4353
WFS 310*3Wildlife Selection3
WFS 4522ECON 1043
Natural Resource Policy, Planning, Law, Administration (PPLA) and Human Dimensions (HD) Course3Natural Resource Policy, Planning, Law, Administration (PPLA) and Human Dimensions (HD) Course3
Elective0-4 
 12-16 15
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
WFS 4103WFS 463W3
WFS 4532WFS 4463
ENGL 202C‡†3General Education Course3
AEE 440, ENGL 416, or ENGL 4183General Education Course (GHW)1.5
Physical Science Selection3Elective3
General Education Course (GHW)1.5 
 15.5 13.5
Total Credits 119-129

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

  • All supporting course selections are listed in the WFS Handbook, which is available on the department’s website (http://ecosystems.psu.edu), under Student Resources, Student Handbooks.
  • In the WFS program, either STAT 200 or STAT 250 is accepted as a substitute for the “STAT 240 or 301” requirement. It is important to complete STAT before the start of your fifth semester.
  • Many WFS classes are offered only once per year, in the fall or the spring; plan your schedule accordingly.
  • All WFS students should change their campus location to University Park by the start of their junior year (fifth semester).
  • When a required course has both a lecture and practicum portion, such as PHYS 250L and PHYS 250R, students are required to take both portions.
  • Courses that are listed as both US or IL and GA, GH, or GS can count for both requirements (i.e., a course listed for both GA and IL will satisfy both Arts and International Cultures).
  • Students should monitor their academic progress by checking their degree audits in LionPATH.
  • Questions about WFS academic plans or degree audits should be directed to academic advisers or to WFS Program Coordinator Ellen Rom, exr2@psu.edu or 814-863-0362.

Wildlife Option: Wildlife and Fisheries Science, B.S. at University Park Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 1104CHEM 1103
MATH 110 or 140*‡†4CHEM 1111
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3MATH 111 or 1412-4
General Education Course3WFS 209N*3
First-Year Seminar1-3General Education Course3
 15-17 12-14
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 220W*4PHYS 2504
FOR 2033BIOL 240W4
CHEM 2023CAS 100, 100A, 100B, or 100C‡†3
BIOL 133, 222, 230W, or ANSC 3223-4SOILS 1013
STAT 240 or 301‡†3General Education Course 3
 16-17 17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
WFS 300*2FOR 350 or STAT 4603
WFS 301*2WFS 407 or 4083
WFS 310*3WFS 406 or 4092
Natural Resource Policy, Planning, Law, Administration (PPLA) and Human Dimensions (HD) Course3ECON 1043
Elective3Natural Resource Policy, Planning, Law, Administration (PPLA) and Human Dimensions (HD) Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 16 15.5
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
WFS 447W3WFS 4463
ENGL 202C‡†3WFS 407 or 4083
AEE 440, ENGL 416, or ENGL 4183General Education Course3
Fisheries Selection2-3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
Botany Selection3Elective1-5
 14-15 11.5-15.5
Total Credits 117-127

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and replace both ENGL 30H and CAS 100. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

  • All supporting course selections are listed in the WFS Handbook, which is available on the department’s website (http://ecosystems.psu.edu), under Student Resources, Student Handbooks.
  • In the WFS program, either STAT 200 or STAT 250 is accepted as a substitute for the “STAT 240 or 301” requirement. It is important to complete STAT before the start of your fifth semester.
  • Many WFS classes are offered only once per year, in the fall or the spring; plan your schedule accordingly.
  • All WFS students should change their campus location to University Park by the start of their junior year (fifth semester).
  • When a required course has both a lecture and practicum portion, such as PHYS 250L and PHYS 250R, students are required to take both portions.
  • Courses that are listed as both US or IL and GA, GH, or GS can count for both requirements (i.e., a course listed for both GA and IL will satisfy both Arts and International Cultures).
  • Students should monitor their academic progress by checking their degree audits in LionPATH.
  • Questions about WFS academic plans or degree audits should be directed to academic advisers or to WFS Program Coordinator Ellen Rom, exr2@psu.edu or 814-863-0362.

Fisheries Option: Wildlife and Fisheries Science, B.S. at Commonwealth Campuses

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 1104CHEM 1103
MATH 110 or 140‡†4CHEM 1111
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3MATH 111 or 1412-4
General Education Course3BIOL 220W*4
First-Year Seminar1-3General Education Course3
 General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 15-17 14.5-16.5
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ANSC 201, BIOL 141 and BIOL 142, or BIOL 4463-4PHYS 2504
CHEM 2023BIOL 240W4
BIOL 133, 222, 230W, or ANSC 3223-4ENGL 202C‡†3
STAT 240 or 301‡†3ECON 1043
CAS 100‡†3General Education Course 3
 15-17 17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
WFS 209N*3FOR 350 or STAT 4603
WFS 300*2ENT 425, FOR 470, WFS 422, or WFS 4353
WFS 301*2SOILS 1013
WFS 310*3Natural Resource Policy, Planning, Law, Administration (PPLA) and Human Dimensions (HD) Course3
WFS 4522Elective0-4
General Education Course3 
 15 12-16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
WFS 4103WFS 463W3
WFS 4532WFS 4463
AEE 440, ENGL 416, or ENGL 4183Physical Science Selection3
Wildlife Selection3Natural Resource Policy, Planning, Law, Administration (PPLA) and Human Dimensions (HD) Course3
General Education Course3Elective3
General Education Course (GHW)1.5 
 15.5 15
Total Credits 119-129

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

Advising Notes:

  • All supporting course selections are listed in the WFS Handbook, which is available on the department’s website (http://ecosystems.psu.edu), under Student Resources, Student Handbooks.
  • In the WFS program, either STAT 200 or STAT 250 is accepted as a substitute for the “STAT 240 or 301” requirement. It is important to complete STAT before the start of your fifth semester.
  • Many WFS classes are offered only once per year, in the fall or the spring; plan your schedule accordingly.
  • All WFS students should change their campus location to University Park by the start of their junior year (fifth semester).
  • When a required course has both a lecture and practicum portion, such as PHYS 250L and PHYS 250R, students are required to take both portions.
  • Courses that are listed as both US or IL and GA, GH, or GS can count for both requirements (i.e., a course listed for both GA and IL will satisfy both Arts and International Cultures).
  • Students should monitor their academic progress by checking their degree audits in LionPATH.
  • Questions about WFS academic plans or degree audits should be directed to academic advisers or to WFS Program Coordinator Ellen Rom, exr2@psu.edu or 814-863-0362.

Wildlife Option: Wildlife and Fisheries Science, B.S. at Commonwealth Campuses

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 1104CHEM 1103
MATH 110 or 140‡†4CHEM 1111
ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3MATH 111 or 1412-4
General Education Course3BIOL 220W*4
First-Year Seminar1-3General Education Course3
 General Education Course3
 15-17 16-18
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 2023PHYS 2504
BIOL 133, 222, 230W, or ANSC 3223-4BIOL 240W4
STAT 240 or 301‡†3ENGL 202C‡†3
CAS 100‡†3ECON 1043
General Education Coures (GHW)1.5General Education Course 3
 13.5-14.5 17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
WFS 209N*3FOR 350 or STAT 4603
FOR 2033WFS 407 or 4083
WFS 300*2WFS 406 or 4092
WFS 301*2SOILS 1013
WFS 310*3Elective3
Natural Resource Policy, Planning, Law, Administration (PPLA) and Human Dimensions (HD) Course3 
 16 14
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
WFS 447W3WFS 4463
ENGL 202C‡†3WFS 407 or 4083
AEE 440, ENGL 416, or ENGL 4183Natural Resource Policy, Planning, Law, Administration (PPLA) and Human Dimensions (HD) Course3
Fisheries Selection2-3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
Botany Selection3Elective1-5
General Education Course3 
 17-18 11.5-15.5
Total Credits 120-130

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

Advising Notes:

  • All supporting course selections are listed in the WFS Handbook, which is available on the department’s website (http://ecosystems.psu.edu), under Student Resources, Student Handbooks.
  • In the WFS program, either STAT 200 or STAT 250 is accepted as a substitute for the “STAT 240 or 301” requirement. It is important to complete STAT before the start of your fifth semester.
  • Many WFS classes are offered only once per year, in the fall or the spring; plan your schedule accordingly.
  • All WFS students should change their campus location to University Park by the start of their junior year (fifth semester).
  • When a required course has both a lecture and practicum portion, such as PHYS 250L and PHYS 250R, students are required to take both portions.
  • Courses that are listed as both US or IL and GA, GH, or GS can count for both requirements (i.e., a course listed for both GA and IL will satisfy both Arts and International Cultures).
  • Students should monitor their academic progress by checking their degree audits in LionPATH.
  • Questions about WFS academic plans or degree audits should be directed to academic advisers or to WFS Program Coordinator Ellen Rom, exr2@psu.edu or 814-863-0362.

Career Paths

Employment in the wildlife and fisheries professions is highly competitive. Related work experience is often required for post-graduation employment. Students get that experience from summer jobs, internships, or independent study projects. Flexibility in job location and willingness to accept seasonal or part-time work can increase employment prospects. Our curriculum can provide a firm base for graduate study, as well as the opportunity to meet certification standards established by The Wildlife Society and the American Fisheries Society, and the academic requirements set by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management for federal employment as a wildlife or fisheries biologist.

Careers

Wildlife/fisheries technician or biologist, ecologist, conservation officer, environmental educator, habitat manager, and zookeeper are just some of the opportunities pursued by Wildlife and Fisheries Science graduates. Employers include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, the USDA Wildlife Service, the Pennsylvania Game Commission, and conservation districts, as well as nongovernmental organizations and private industry.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT POTENTIAL CAREER OPTIONS FOR GRADUATES OF THE WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES SCIENCE PROGRAM

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDIES

Professional Resources

Contact

University Park

DEPARTMENT OF ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT
Undergraduate Programs Office
113 Forest Resources Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-865-4237

https://ecosystems.psu.edu