Community, Environment, and Development, B.S.

Program Code: CED_BS

Program Description

Community, Environment, and Development is a hands-on, multidisciplinary program that helps students understand and address challenges faced by communities abroad and at home. It focuses on areas like sustainability, community, development, local governance, and more with the goal of balancing environmental stewardship with improved quality of life. The major emphasizes critical thinking, core knowledge, and the skills required for professional success working on such issues. Graduates take leadership roles in a variety of areas, such as corporate social responsibility, environment/sustainability, economic development, government, land use planning, and the non-profit sector. Foundation (Level I) courses introduce students to key concepts in economics and sociology, and how these inform an understanding of community, sustainability and the environment, quality of life, and the economy. Level II courses build on the Foundation courses by using these concepts to take deep looks at issues like climate change, inequality, corporate social responsibility, and land use to assess what’s working- and what needs work. Coursework in Methods, Quantification and Communication is also required, including skills and techniques such as Geographical Information Analysis, statistics, applied research methods, and the communication skills for successfully engaging governments, businesses, other organizations, and residents. Finally, students select among four options:

  1. Community and Economic Development,
  2. Environmental Economics and Policy,
  3. International Development,
  4. Social and Environmental Responsibility.

To complement this core, students take an additional 12 credits in an area of their interest outside of the CED major to tailor their studies towards their specific education and career goals. Around 40 percent of students completing the program continue on to graduate school or law school, while others choose employment after graduation.

You Might Like this Program If...

  • You are passionate about domestic or international development, environmental quality, or sustainability
  • You would like a problem-oriented, customizable major that blends together economics, sociology, and other disciplines to give you a wide skillset
  • You want small classes where professors know your name, and that emphasize discussion
  • You are a “people person” and want a career that betters people’s lives
  • You want a solid foundation for going to law school or graduate school

Entrance to Major

In order to be eligible for entrance to this major, a student must:

  1. attain at least a C (2.00) cumulative grade-point average for all courses taken at the University; and
  2. have at least third-semester classification.

READ SENATE POLICY 37-30: ENTRANCE TO AND CHANGES IN MAJOR PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Degree Requirements

For the Bachelor of Science degree in Community, Environment, and Development, a minimum of 120 credits is required:

Requirement Credits
General Education 45
Electives 4-6
Requirements for the Major 90-92

21 of the 45 credits for General Education are included in the Requirements for the Major. This includes: 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GS courses, 9 credits of GWS.

Requirements for the Major

To graduate, a student enrolled in the major must earn a grade of C or better in each course designated by the major as a C-required course, as specified by Senate Policy 82-44.

Common Requirements for the Major (All Options)

Prescribed Courses
CED 252Anti-Racist Theory and Practice in Community Work3
CED 275Community, Environment and Development Professional Seminar1
CED 404Community, Environment and Development Research Methods4
CED 417Power, Conflict, and Community Decision Making3
CED 475CED Integrated Capstone Experience3
ECON 104Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy Keystone/General Education Course3
Prescribed Courses: Require a grade of C or better
CED 152Community Development Concepts and Practice Keystone/General Education Course3
CED 201Introductory Environmental and Resource Economics3
CED 230Development Issues in the Global Context3
CED 309Land Economics and Policy3
CED 327Environment and Society3
STAT 200Elementary Statistics Keystone/General Education Course4
Additional Courses
AGBM 101Economic Principles of Agribusiness Decision Making Keystone/General Education Course3
or ECON 102 Introductory Microeconomic Analysis and Policy Keystone/General Education Course
GEOG 160Mapping Our Changing World Keystone/General Education Course3
or GEOG 260 Geographic Information in a Changing World: Introduction to GIScience Keystone/General Education Course
RSOC 11Intro Rural Sociology Keystone/General Education Course3
or SOC 1 Introductory Sociology Keystone/General Education Course
Select one of the following:3
American Politics: Principles, Processes and Powers Keystone/General Education Course
Comparing Politics around the Globe Keystone/General Education Course
International Relations Keystone/General Education Course
Additional Courses: Require a grade of C or better
CAS 100Effective Speech3
or CAS 138T Rhetoric and Civic Life II Keystone/General Education Course
CMPSC 203Introduction to Spreadsheets and Databases Keystone/General Education Course3-4
or AGBM 106 Agribusiness Problem Solving Keystone/General Education Course
Select one of the following:3
Rhetoric and Civic Life I Keystone/General Education Course
Rhetoric and Composition Keystone/General Education Course
Rhetoric and Civic Life I Keystone/General Education Course
Select one of the following:3
Effective Writing: Writing in the Social Sciences Keystone/General Education Course
Effective Writing: Writing in the Humanities Keystone/General Education Course
Effective Writing: Technical Writing Keystone/General Education Course
Effective Writing: Business Writing Keystone/General Education Course
Select one of the following:3-4
College Algebra With Analytic Geometry and Applications II Keystone/General Education Course
Techniques of Calculus I Keystone/General Education Course
Calculus With Analytic Geometry I Keystone/General Education Course
Requirements for the Option
Select an option27

Requirements for the Option

Community and Economic Development Option (27 credits)
Prescribed Courses
AEE 460Foundations in Leadership Development3
CED 409Land Use Planning and Procedure3
CED 430WPrinciples of Community Economic Development3
ERM 411Legal Aspects of Resource Management3
Additional Courses
Select one of the following:3
Community, Local Knowledge, and Democracy
Exploring Indigenous Ways of Knowing in Great Lakes Region: Lecture Keystone/General Education Course
Community Structure, Processes and Capacity
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 12 credit in specialization12
Environmental Economics and Policy Option (27 credits)
Prescribed Courses
CED 429Natural Resource Economics3
CED 431WEconomic Analysis of Environmental and Resource Policies3
ECON 302Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis Keystone/General Education Course3
ECON 428Environmental Economics3
ERM 411Legal Aspects of Resource Management3
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 12 credits in specialization12
International Development Option (27 credits)
Prescribed Courses
CED 420WGender and International Development3
CED 425International Community and Economic Development3
CED 445International Development Practice3
Additional Courses
CED 410The Global Seminar3
or SOC 23 Population and Policy Issues Keystone/General Education Course
Select one of the following:3
International Development, Renewable Resources, and the Environment
International Economics Keystone/General Education Course
International Political Economy
Globalization and Its Implications
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 12 credit in specialization12
Social and Environmental Responsibility Option (27 credits)
Prescribed Courses
CED 360The Corporation and Social Responsibility3
CED 440Labor in the Global Economy3
CED 460WPolicy, Politics and Perspectives on Social & Environmental Responsibility3
CED 462Corporate Social and Environmental Performance3
Additional Courses
AGBM 308WStrategic Decision Making in Agribusiness3
or AGBM 460 Managing the Food System
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 12 credits in specialization12

General Education

Connecting career and curiosity, the General Education curriculum provides the opportunity for students to acquire transferable skills necessary to be successful in the future and to thrive while living in interconnected contexts. General Education aids students in developing intellectual curiosity, a strengthened ability to think, and a deeper sense of aesthetic appreciation. These are requirements for all baccalaureate students and are often partially incorporated into the requirements of a program. For additional information, see the General Education Requirements section of the Bulletin and consult your academic adviser.

The keystone symbol Keystone/General Education Course appears next to the title of any course that is designated as a General Education course. Program requirements may also satisfy General Education requirements and vary for each program.

Foundations (grade of C or better is required and Inter-Domain courses do not meet this requirement.)

  • Quantification (GQ): 6 credits
  • Writing and Speaking (GWS): 9 credits

Breadth in the Knowledge Domains (Inter-Domain courses do not meet this requirement.)

  • Arts (GA): 3 credits
  • Health and Wellness (GHW): 3 credits
  • Humanities (GH): 3 credits
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS): 3 credits
  • Natural Sciences (GN): 3 credits

Integrative Studies

  • Inter-Domain Courses (Inter-Domain): 6 credits

Exploration

  • GN, may be completed with Inter-Domain courses: 3 credits
  • GA, GH, GN, GS, Inter-Domain courses. This may include 3 credits of World Language course work beyond the 12th credit level or the requirements for the student’s degree program, whichever is higher: 6 credits

University Degree Requirements

First Year Engagement

All students enrolled in a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies at University Park, and the World Campus are required to take 1 to 3 credits of the First-Year Seminar, as specified by their college First-Year Engagement Plan.

Other Penn State colleges and campuses may require the First-Year Seminar; colleges and campuses that do not require a First-Year Seminar provide students with a first-year engagement experience.

First-year baccalaureate students entering Penn State should consult their academic adviser for these requirements.

Cultures Requirement

6 credits are required and may satisfy other requirements

  • United States Cultures: 3 credits
  • International Cultures: 3 credits

Writing Across the Curriculum

3 credits required from the college of graduation and likely prescribed as part of major requirements.

Total Minimum Credits

A minimum of 120 degree credits must be earned for a baccalaureate degree. The requirements for some programs may exceed 120 credits. Students should consult with their college or department adviser for information on specific credit requirements.

Quality of Work

Candidates must complete the degree requirements for their major and earn at least a 2.00 grade-point average for all courses completed within their degree program.

Limitations on Source and Time for Credit Acquisition

The college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. Credit used toward degree programs may need to be earned from a particular source or within time constraints (see Senate Policy 83-80). For more information, check the Suggested Academic Plan for your intended program.

Program Learning Objectives

  • Critical Thinking Skills and Scholarship: Read, interpret and critically analyze a broad range of community, environment and development sources.
    • Use a combination of economic and sociological analytical tools to understand and explain complex community, environment, and development issues, including their contested and uncertain nature.
    • Explain community political and power structures, social dynamics, inequity, diverse value systems, ideologies, and cultures.
    • Use basic economic concepts of scarcity, choice, supply, and demand to explain typical community, environment, and development problems.
    • Describe important community, environment, and development policy issues occurring at community, state, national, and international levels.
    • Explain the connections between individuals, households, communities, and regions in a globalizing world, including the centrality of human interdependence and relationships for understanding community, environment, and development issues.
    • Integrate and synthesize these Learning Objectives, recognizing their interdependence and connections.
  • Research Skills: Think systemically and construct logical arguments in research design and research activities.
    • Identify and describe one’s power and privilege in applied research and how these affect research design and process, findings, implications and impacts in the community.
    • Describe the benefit of using research methodologies based upon community perspectives and knowledge, and the implications of these methodologies for selection and use of appropriate research methods.
    • Use basic data collection research skills, including interviews, focus groups, and surveys.
    • Use basic qualitative and quantitative research skills, including coding, descriptive secondary data analysis, and bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses.
    • Use basic mapping analysis skills.
    • Access, download, analyze and interpret common economic and social secondary data.
    • Measure inequality using quantitative and social qualitative measures.
    • Gain experience in designing and conducting community-based participatory research.
  • Team and Community Engagement Skills: Work effectively as a member of a team.
    • Understand and gain experience with community engagement strategy and process.
    • Explain the politics of engagement, and engagement as politics and power shifting, and its implications for CED-related work.
    • Distinguish between democracy as the everyday politics of civic or public work involving citizens versus partisan party politics.
    • Use methods and techniques for effective community engagement, including involving inclusion/representation of the multiple facets of the community, facilitation, meeting management, SWOT analysis, and brainstorming.
    • Understand allyship and advocacy work and use skills and sensitivity to work effectively with and across varied groups and individuals.
  • Communication & Civic Skills: Discuss ideas confidently and freely in an academic fashion, both with faculty and with other students.
    • Describe the power of narrative, including how narrative is used to shape perceptions of an issue.
    • Determine appropriate methods to develop strong and inclusive communication with stakeholders, building greater levels of understanding, engagement, and equity.
    • Write clear and coherent research papers and essays, appropriate for the audience.
    • Competently and confidently make oral presentations in diverse professional and applied situations.
    • Develop, practice and hone active listening skills.
    • Understand, gain experience with, and develop capability to use questions to communicate ideas, understand community issues, and individual, group, and community capacity.
  • Equity & Inclusion: Describe how inequity can hinder the emergence of community and community capacity, the influence that the history of inequity currently has on individuals and community, and how inequality currently manifests itself.
    • Describe how societal outcomes and the choices available to individuals are shaped by human interdependence, politics and public choice, and power.
    • Use normative ethics and social science tools to identify inequalities at the community level, diagnose their nature, and develop inclusive and engaged approaches for overcoming these.

Academic Advising

The objectives of the university's academic advising program are to help advisees identify and achieve their academic goals, to promote their intellectual discovery, and to encourage students to take advantage of both in-and out-of class educational opportunities in order that they become self-directed learners and decision makers.

Both advisers and advisees share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed. By encouraging their advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning, advisers assume a significant educational role. The advisee's unit of enrollment will provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser, the information needed to plan the chosen program of study, and referrals to other specialized resources.

READ SENATE POLICY 32-00: ADVISING POLICY

University Park

Charlene Paquette
Undergraduate Student Services Coordinator
201 Armsby Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-865-0467
clp27@psu.edu

SUGGESTED ACADEMIC PLAN

The suggested academic plan(s) listed on this page are the plan(s) that are in effect during the 2023-24 academic year. To access previous years' suggested academic plans, please visit the archive to view the appropriate Undergraduate Bulletin edition (Note: the archive only contains suggested academic plans beginning with the 2018-19 edition of the Undergraduate Bulletin).

COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OPTION: COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT, B.S. AT UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AGBM 101 or ECON 1023ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3
RSOC 11 or SOC 13MATH 22, 110, or 140‡†3-4
AGSC 1001ECON 1043
CED 152*3GEOG 160 or 2603
General Education Course3CED 2751
 General Education Course3
 13 16-17
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 309*3AGBM 106 or CMPSC 203‡†3-4
CED 230*3CED 201*3
STAT 2004CED 2523
General Education Course3CED 4044
General Education Course3CAS 100, CAS 100A, CAS 100B, or CAS 100C‡†3
 16 16-17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ENGL 202A, 202B, 202C, or 202D‡†3CED 375, 400N, CEDEV 452, or RSOC 400N3
ERM 411 or BLAW 4253CED 327*3
AEE 4603Specialty Area Course3
PLSC 1, 3, or 143General Education Course3
Specialty Area Course3General Education Course3
 General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 15 16.5
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 4753CED 430W3
CED 4173CED 4093
General Education Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
Elective3Specialty Area Course3
Specialty Area Course3Elective2
 15 12.5
Total Credits 120-122
*

Course requires a grade of C or better for the major

Course requires a grade of C or better for General Education

#

Course is an Entrance to Major requirement

Course satisfies General Education and degree requirement

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy Cultural Diversity Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ), Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS) and Integrative Studies (Inter-domain) requirements. N or Q (Honors) is the suffix at the end of a course number used to help identify an Inter-domain course, but the inter-domain attribute is used to fill audit requirements. Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of 'C' or better.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and satisfy a portion of that General Education requirement. If the student’s program prescribes GWS these courses will replace both ENGL 15/ENGL 30H and CAS 100A/CAS 100B/CAS 100C. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

  • Only 21 credits of General Education requirements may be applied toward major requirements.
  • Please consult with an academic adviser in the development of your plan as some courses are not taught every semester.
  • Students should complete CED 152 as early in their academic plan as possible.

ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND POLICY OPTION: COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT, B.S. AT UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AGBM 101 or ECON 1023ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3
RSOC 11 or SOC 13MATH 110 or 140‡†4
AGSC 1001ECON 1043
CED 152*3GEOG 160 or 2603
CAS 100A, 100B, or 100C‡†3CED 2751
General Education Course3General Education Course3
 16 17
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 309*3AGBM 106 or CMPSC 203‡†3-4
CED 230*3CED 201*3
STAT 2004CED 2523
General Education Course3CED 4044
General Education Course3Specialty Area Course3
 16 16-17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 4173CED 327*3
PLSC 1, 3, or 143CED 329H3
ECON 3023Specialty Area Course3
ENGL 202A, 202B, 202C, or 202D‡†3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 4753General Education Course (GHW)3
CED 4293Specialty Area Course3
CED 431W3Specialty Area Course3
ERM 411 or BLAW 4253Elective4
 12 13
Total Credits 120-121
*

Course requires a grade of C or better for the major

Course requires a grade of C or better for General Education

#

Course is an Entrance to Major requirement

Course satisfies General Education and degree requirement

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy Cultural Diversity Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ), Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS) and Integrative Studies (Inter-domain) requirements. N or Q (Honors) is the suffix at the end of a course number used to help identify an Inter-domain course, but the inter-domain attribute is used to fill audit requirements. Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of 'C' or better.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and satisfy a portion of that General Education requirement. If the student’s program prescribes GWS these courses will replace both ENGL 15/ENGL 30H and CAS 100A/CAS 100B/CAS 100C. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

  • Only 21-22 credits of General Education requirements may be applied toward major requirements.
  • Please consult with an academic adviser in the development of your plan as some courses are not taught every semester.
  • Students should complete CED 152 as early in their academic plan as possible.
  • MATH 110 or MATH 140 is recommended for the EEP option.

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTION: COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT, B.S. AT  UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AGBM 101 or ECON 1023ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3
RSOC 11 or SOC 13MATH 22, 110, or 140‡†3-4
AGSC 1001ECON 1043
CED 152*3GEOG 160 or 2603
CAS 100A, 100B, or 100C‡†3CED 2751
General Education Course3General Education Course3
 16 16-17
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 309*3AGBM 106 or CMPSC 203‡†3-4
CED 230*3CED 201*3
STAT 2004CED 2523
Specialty Area Course3CED 4044
General Education Course3General Education Course3
 16 16-17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PLSC 1, 3, or 143CED 327*3
CED 4453CED 410 or SOC 233
ENGL 202A, 202B, 202C, or 202D‡†3Specialty Area Course3
Specialty Area Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 15 13.5
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AFR 440, CED 450, ECON 333, IB 440, PLSC 412, or PLSC 4403CED 420W3
CED 4753CED 4253
CED 4173Elective 2
Specialty Area Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
General Education Course3Specialty Area Course3
 15 12.5
Total Credits 120-122
*

Course requires a grade of C or better for the major

Course requires a grade of C or better for General Education

#

Course is an Entrance to Major requirement

Course satisfies General Education and degree requirement

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy Cultural Diversity Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ), Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS) and Integrative Studies (Inter-domain) requirements. N or Q (Honors) is the suffix at the end of a course number used to help identify an Inter-domain course, but the inter-domain attribute is used to fill audit requirements. Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of 'C' or better.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and satisfy a portion of that General Education requirement. If the student’s program prescribes GWS these courses will replace both ENGL 15/ENGL 30H and CAS 100A/CAS 100B/CAS 100C. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

  • Only 21 credits of General Education requirements may be applied toward major requirements.
  • Please consult with an academic adviser in the development of your plan as some courses are not taught every semester.
  • Students should complete CED 152 as early in their academic plan as possible.

SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY OPTION: COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT, B.S. AT UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 152*3ECON 1043
RSOC 11 or SOC 13GEOG 160 or 2603
AGBM 101 or ECON 1023ENGL 15 or 30H‡†3
AGSC 1001MATH 22, 110, or 140‡†3-4
CAS 100A, 100B, or 100C‡†3CED 2751
General Education Requirement (GN, GA, GH)3 
 16 13-14
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 309*3CED 201*3
CED 230*3CED 2523
General Education Requirement (GN, GA, GH)3CED 4044
STAT 200‡†4AGBM 106 or CMPSC 2033-4
General Education Requirement (GN, GA, GH)3General Education Requirement (GN, GA, GH)3
 16 16-17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 360 (Fall Only)3CED 327*3
CED 4173CED 440 (Spring Only)3
PLSC 1, 3, or 143General Education Requirement (GN, GA, GH)3
General Education Requirement (GN, GA, GH)3Specialization Course3
ENGL 202A, 202B, 202C, or 202D‡†3Specialization Course3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AGBM 308W or 4603CED 460W (Spring Only)3
CED 462 (Fall Only)3Specialization Course3
CED 475 (Senior Capstone)3Specialization Course3
General Education - Health and Wellness (GHW)1.5General Education - Health and Wellness (GHW)1.5
General Education Requirement (GN, GA, GH)3Elective5
 13.5 15.5
Total Credits 120-122
*

Course requires a grade of C or better for the major

Course requires a grade of C or better for General Education

#

Course is an Entrance to Major requirement

Course satisfies General Education and degree requirement

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy Cultural Diversity Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ), Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS) and Integrative Studies (Inter-domain) requirements. N or Q (Honors) is the suffix at the end of a course number used to help identify an Inter-domain course, but the inter-domain attribute is used to fill audit requirements. Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of 'C' or better.

All incoming Schreyer Honors College first-year students at University Park will take ENGL 137H/CAS 137H in the fall semester and ENGL 138T/CAS 138T in the spring semester. These courses carry the GWS designation and satisfy a portion of that General Education requirement. If the student’s program prescribes GWS these courses will replace both ENGL 15/ENGL 30H and CAS 100A/CAS 100B/CAS 100C. Each course is 3 credits.

Advising Notes:

  • 22-23 credits of General Education requirements may be applied toward major requirements.
  • Students should take CED 152 as early in their academic plan as possible.
  • Please consult with an academic adviser in the development of your plan as some courses are not taught every semester.

COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OPTION: COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT, B.S. AT COMMONWEALTH CAMPUSES

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 22, 110, or 140‡†3-4ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3
AGBM 101 or ECON 1023ECON 1043
RSOC 11 or SOC 13STAT 2004
General Education Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 15-16 14.5
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AGBM 106 or CMPSC 203‡†3-4ENGL 202A, 202B, 202C, or 202D‡†3
PLSC 1, 3, or 143GEOG 160 or 2603
CAS 100‡†3Specialty Area Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
 15-16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 152*3CED 201*3
CED 230*3CED 2523
ERM 411 or BLAW 4253CED 2751
Specialty Area Course3CED 327*3
Elective3CED 4044
 Elective3
 15 17
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AEE 4603CED 375, 400N, CEDEV 452, or RSOC 400N3
CED 309*3CED 4093
CED 4173CED 430W3
CED 4753Specialty Area Course3
Specialty Area Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 15 13.5
Total Credits 120-122
*

Course requires a grade of C or better for the major

Course requires a grade of C or better for General Education

#

Course is an Entrance to Major requirement

Course satisfies General Education and degree requirement

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy Cultural Diversity Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ), Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS) and Integrative Studies (Inter-domain) requirements. N or Q (Honors) is the suffix at the end of a course number used to help identify an Inter-domain course, but the inter-domain attribute is used to fill audit requirements. Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of 'C' or better.

Advising Notes:

  • Only 21 credits of General Education requirements may be applied toward major requirements.
  • Please consult with an academic adviser in the development of your plan as some courses are not taught every semester.
  • Students should complete CED 152 as early in their academic plan as possible.

ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND POLICY OPTION: COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT, B.S. AT COMMONWEALTH CAMPUSES

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 110 or 140‡†4ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3
AGBM 101 or ECON 1023ECON 1043
RSOC 11 or SOC 13STAT 2004
General Education Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 16 14.5
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AGBM 106 or CMPSC 203‡†3-4ENGL 202A, 202B, 202C, or 202D‡†3
PLSC 1, 3, or 143GEOG 160 or 2603
CAS 100‡†3Specialty Area Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
 15-16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 152*3CED 201*3
CED 230*3CED 2523
ECON 3023CED 2751
Specialty Area Course3CED 309*3
Specialty Area Course3CED 4044
 Elective3
 15 17
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 4173CED 327*3
CED 4293CED 329H3
CED 431W3Specialty Area Course3
ERM 411 or BLAW 4253Elective2
CED 4753General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 15 12.5
Total Credits 120-121
*

Course requires a grade of C or better for the major

Course requires a grade of C or better for General Education

#

Course is an Entrance to Major requirement

Course satisfies General Education and degree requirement

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy Cultural Diversity Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ), Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS) and Integrative Studies (Inter-domain) requirements. N or Q (Honors) is the suffix at the end of a course number used to help identify an Inter-domain course, but the inter-domain attribute is used to fill audit requirements. Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of 'C' or better.

Advising Notes:

  • Only 21-22 credits of General Education requirements may be applied toward major requirements.
  • Please consult with an academic adviser in the development of your plan as some courses are not taught every semester.
  • Students should complete CED 152 as early in their academic plan as possible.
  • MATH 110 or MATH 140 is recommended for the EEP option.

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTION: COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT, B.S. AT COMMONWEALTH CAMPUSES

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 22, 110, or 140‡†3-4ENGL 15, 30H, or ESL 15‡†3
AGBM 101 or ECON 1023ECON 1043
RSOC 11 or SOC 13STAT 2004
General Education Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 15-16 14.5
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AGBM 106 or CMPSC 203‡†3-4ENGL 202A, 202B, 202C, or 202D‡†3
PLSC 1, 3, or 143GEOG 160 or 2603
CAS 100‡†3Specialty Area Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
 15-16 15
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 152*3CED 201*3
CED 230*3CED 2523
CED 309*3CED 2751
Specialty Area Course3CED 327*3
Elective3CED 4044
 General Education Course3
 15 17
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AFR 440, CED 450, ECON 333, IB 440, PLSC 412, or PLSC 4403CED 410 or SOC 233
CED 4173CED 420W3
CED 4453CED 4253
CED 4753Specialty Area Course3
Specialty Area Course3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
 15 13.5
Total Credits 120-122
*

Course requires a grade of C or better for the major

Course requires a grade of C or better for General Education

#

Course is an Entrance to Major requirement

Course satisfies General Education and degree requirement

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy Cultural Diversity Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ), Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS) and Integrative Studies (Inter-domain) requirements. N or Q (Honors) is the suffix at the end of a course number used to help identify an Inter-domain course, but the inter-domain attribute is used to fill audit requirements. Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of 'C' or better.

Advising Notes:

  • Only 21 credits of General Education requirements may be applied toward major requirements.
  • Please consult with an academic adviser in the development of your plan as some courses are not taught every semester.
  • Students should complete CED 152 as early in their academic plan as possible.

SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY OPTION: COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT, B.S. AT COMMONWEALTH CAMPUSES

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
General Education Course (GN, GA, GH)3General Education Course - Health and Wellness (GHW)1.5
RSOC 11 or SOC 13PLSC 1, 3, or 143
AGBM 101 or ECON 1023ECON 1043
ENGL 15 or 30H‡†3MATH 22, 110, or 140‡†3-4
General Education Course3General Education Course (GN, GA, GH)3
 CAS 100‡†3
 15 16.5-17.5
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
General Education Course - Health and Wellness (GHW)1.5ENGL 202A, 202B, 202C, or 202D‡†3
GEOG 160 or 2603STAT 200‡†4
General Education Course (GN, GA, GH)3General Education Course (GN, GA, GH) 3
AGBM 106 or CMPSC 2033-4Specialization Course3
General Education Course (GN, GA, GH)3General Education Course (GN, GA, GH) 3
 13.5-14.5 16
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 152*3CED 201*3
CED 230*3CED 2523
CED 309*3CED 2751
Specialization Course3CED 327*3
Elective3Specialization Course3
 CED 4044
 15 17
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CED 360 (Fall Only)3CED 460W (Spring Only)3
AGBM 308W or 4603CED 440 (Spring Only)3
CED 4173Specialization Course3
CED 462 (Fall Only)3Elective3
CED 475 (Senior Capstone)3 
 15 12
Total Credits 120-122
*

Course requires a grade of C or better for the major

Course requires a grade of C or better for General Education

#

Course is an Entrance to Major requirement

Course satisfies General Education and degree requirement

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy Cultural Diversity Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ), Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS) and Integrative Studies (Inter-domain) requirements. N or Q (Honors) is the suffix at the end of a course number used to help identify an Inter-domain course, but the inter-domain attribute is used to fill audit requirements. Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of 'C' or better.

Advising Notes:

  • 22-23 credits of General Education requirements may be applied toward major requirements.
  • Students should take CED 152 as early in their academic plan as possible.
  • Please consult with an academic adviser in the development of your plan as some courses are not taught every semester.

Career Paths

Community, Environment, and Development graduates have the skills and knowledge necessary to choose from a variety of fulfilling career paths in domestic or international development, environment analysis, or sustainability. Your career depends on the experience you make for yourself as a student. Faculty and professional academic advisers in the Community, Environment, and Development program support and serve students in career development and preparation, including career decision-making, tailoring the CED major to fit career goals, internship and job search strategies, interview preparation, and preparing for employment or graduate school.

Careers

With a Community, Environment, and Development degree, you may be prepared for a career working on community-level issues, such as economic and community development, sustainability, the environment and natural resources, and international development. Many graduates choose careers in environment/sustainability, corporate social responsibility, economic development, local government, community-based nonprofits, or local foods.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT POTENTIAL CAREER OPTIONS FOR GRADUATES OF THE COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

Opportunities for Graduate Studies

About 40 percent of CED graduates go to law school or pursue graduate studies.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDIES

Contact

University Park

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, SOCIOLOGY, AND EDUCATION
201 Armsby Building
University Park, PA 16802
814-865-0467
ced@psu.edu

https://agsci.psu.edu/academics/undergraduate/majors/community-environment-and-development