Psychology, B.S. (Capital)

Program Code: PSYC_BS

Entrance to Major

Entry to the Psychology major requires a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average and an average of C (2.00) or better in any courses already taken in the major.

Degree Requirements

For the Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology, a minimum of 122 credits is required:

Requirement Credits
General Education 45
Electives 9
Requirements for the Major 74

6 of the 45 credits for General Education are included in the Requirements for the Major. This includes: 3 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GN courses.

Students admitted to the IUG program may apply 11 credits to their graduate and undergraduate degrees in psychology.

General Education

Connecting career and curiosity, the General Education curriculum provides the opportunity for students to acquire transferable skills necessary to be successful in the future and to thrive while living in interconnected contexts. General Education aids students in developing intellectual curiosity, a strengthened ability to think, and a deeper sense of aesthetic appreciation. These are requirements for all baccalaureate students and are often partially incorporated into the requirements of a program. For additional information, see the General Education Requirements section of the Bulletin and consult your academic adviser.

The keystone symbol Keystone/General Education Course appears next to the title of any course that is designated as a General Education course. Program requirements may also satisfy General Education requirements and vary for each program.

Foundations (grade of C or better is required.)

  • Quantification (GQ): 6 credits
  • Writing and Speaking (GWS): 9 credits

Knowledge Domains

  • Arts (GA): 6 credits
  • Health and Wellness (GHW): 3 credits
  • Humanities (GH): 6 credits
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS): 6 credits
  • Natural Sciences (GN): 9 credits

Integrative Studies (may also complete a Knowledge Domain requirement)

  • Inter-Domain or Approved Linked Courses: 6 credits

University Degree Requirements

First Year Engagement

All students enrolled in a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies at University Park, and the World Campus are required to take 1 to 3 credits of the First-Year Seminar, as specified by their college First-Year Engagement Plan.

Other Penn State colleges and campuses may require the First-Year Seminar; colleges and campuses that do not require a First-Year Seminar provide students with a first-year engagement experience.

First-year baccalaureate students entering Penn State should consult their academic adviser for these requirements.

Cultures Requirement    

6 credits are required and may satisfy other requirements

  • United States Cultures: 3 credits
  • International Cultures: 3 credits

Writing Across the Curriculum

3 credits required from the college of graduation and likely prescribed as part of major requirements.

Total Minimum Credits

A minimum of 120 degree credits must be earned for a baccalaureate degree. The requirements for some programs may exceed 120 credits. Students should consult with their college or department adviser for information on specific credit requirements.

Quality of Work

Candidates must complete the degree requirements for their major and earn at least a 2.00 grade-point average for all courses completed within their degree program.

Limitations on Source and Time for Credit Acquisition

The college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. Credit used toward degree programs may need to be earned from a particular source or within time constraints (see Senate Policy 83-80). For more information, check the Suggested Academic Plan for your intended program.

Requirements for the Major

Students in the IUG program will take 11 credits of graduate work in their senior year, courses PSYC 500, PSYC 520 and PSYC 521. These 11 credits will apply to the graduate program and the undergraduate PSYCH elective undergraduate requirement.

To graduate, a student enrolled in the major must earn a grade of C or better in each course designated by the major as a C-required course, as specified by Senate Policy 82-44.

Prescribed Courses
Prescribed Courses: Require a grade of C or better
ENGL 202AEffective Writing: Writing in the Social Sciences Keystone/General Education Course3
PSYCH 100Introductory Psychology Keystone/General Education Course3
PSYCH 301WBasic Research Methods in Psychology4
Additional Courses
Additional Courses: Require a grade of C or better
BISC 4Human Body: Form and Function Keystone/General Education Course3
or BIOL 141 Introduction to Human Physiology Keystone/General Education Course
(At least 15 credits of the following courses must be at the 400 level.)
Select 4 credits from:4
Category 1 (Statistics)
Elementary Statistics in Psychology Keystone/General Education Course (Statistics)
Elementary Statistics Keystone/General Education Course
Select 6 credits from two different developmental categories of the following (3 credits each category):6
Category 2a (Lifespan)
Introduction to Developmental Psychology Keystone/General Education Course
Category 2b (Adult)
Development Throughout Adulthood
Category 2c (Child)
Child Development
Category 2d (Adolescence)
Adolescence
Select 6 credits from two individual difference categories of the following (3 credits each category):6
Category 3a (Social Psychology)
Introduction to Social Psychology Keystone/General Education Course
Advanced Social Psychology
Category 3b (Personality Psychology)
Introduction to Personality Psychology Keystone/General Education Course
Personality Theory
Category 3c (Personal Adjustment)
Introduction to Well-being and Positive Psychology Keystone/General Education Course
Psychology of Adjustment and Social Relationships
Category 3d (Health Psychology)
Health Psychology
Select 6 credits from two different clinical categories of the following (3 credits each category):6
Category 4a (Physical Disabilities)
Psychology of the Differently-Abled
Category 4b (Childhood Disorders)
Child Psychopathology
Category 4c (Abnormal Psychology)
Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Category 4d (Behavior Modification)
Behavior Modification
Category 4e (Developmental Disabilities)
Treatment and Education in Developmental Disabilities
Select 6 credits from two different experimental categories of the following (3 credits in each category):6
Category 5a (Physiological Psychology)
Neurological Bases of Human Behavior
Physiological Psychology
Category 5b (Cognitive Psychology)
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology Keystone/General Education Course
Learning and Memory
Advanced Cognitive Psychology
Category 5c (Learning Theory)
Introduction to Psychology of Learning Keystone/General Education Course
Advanced Conditioning and Learning
Select 3 credits from applications in psychology of the following:3
Category 6 (Applied Experience)
Internship
Research Projects
Select 12 credits of any PSYCH courses not used above, with the exception that only one course selected from any Category 1 through 5 will count for the major12
Supporting Courses and Related Areas
Select 6 credits of the following:6
AAAS, AMST, ARAB, ART, ARTH, BRASS, CART, CMUS, CAMS, CAS, CHNS, CMLIT, COMM, DANCE, ELISH, ENGL, ENLSH, FR, GER, GREEK, HCOMM, HEBR, HIST, HUM, IHUM, INART, IT, JST, JAPNS, KOR, LATIN, LING, LIT, MEDVL, MUSIC, PHIL, PHILO, PHLOS, PORT, RLST, RUS, SPST, SPAN, STS, THEA, THTRE
Representing Women and Gender in Literature, Art and Popular Cultures Keystone/General Education Course
WMNST 101
Women of the African Diaspora Keystone/General Education Course
Women and the American Experience Keystone/General Education Course
Women in United States History Keystone/General Education Course
Gender, Sexuality, and Religion Keystone/General Education Course
Women Writers Keystone/General Education Course
Gender, Diversity and the Media Keystone/General Education Course
Race and Gender in Literature Translated from French
Women and Theatre
Women in American Society
Feminist Philosophy
Gender Roles in Communication
Reading Black, Reading Feminist
Lesbian and Gay History
British Women Writers
Women Writers and Their Worlds
American Women Writers
Select 12 credits of the following:12
AAAS, AFRAS, ANTH, BESC (except BESC 302), CRIMJ, ECON, HCM, HDFS, PLSC, PUBPL, RSOC, SCLSC, SOSC, SOC
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies Keystone/General Education Course
Racism and Sexism Keystone/General Education Course
Sociology of Gender Keystone/General Education Course
WMNST 116
Race, Gender, and Employment Keystone/General Education Course
Women, Gender, and Feminisms in Africa Keystone/General Education Course
Sexual Identity over the Life Span
Sexual and Domestic Violence
Women and Sport
WMNST 426Y
Gender and Politics
Women's Health Issues
Women and the Criminal Justice System
Gender, Occupations, and Professions
Feminine/Masculine
The Psychology of Gender
Anthropology of Gender

Program Learning Objectives

Content Knowledge:

  1. Demonstrates familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology. Understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of major psychological concepts, theories, and empirical findings.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to apply psychological concepts and theories to research and real life situations.

Research Skills:

  1. Understand basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation.
    1. Differentiate among the research methods used in psychology and apply the designs in evaluation or development of a research study.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret quantitative psychological data using statistics, graphs, and data tables.

Thinking Skills:

  1. Respect and utilize critical and creative thinking skills.
    1. Use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes
    2. Demonstrate critical thinking in the analysis and evaluation of information to distinguish scientific from nonscientific claims related to psychology OR Demonstrate critical thinking in the analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of information in the scientific literature to distinguish the scientific literature from other sources.

Communication Skills:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in a research project, or capstone clinical or research experience.
    1. Communicate effectively (in writing and/or orally) the results of a project or internship.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to effectively extract central points and summarize psychological research literature and to write in the format of psychological research.

Diversity and Ethical Considerations:

  1. Be able to tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a science.
    1. Show evidence of knowledge and appreciation for cultural diversity and relativity in human experience and for the complexity of human behavior and interactions.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge, and the application of, basic principles of scientific and professional ethics.
    3. Demonstrate sensitivity to ethical concerns and professionalism (including cultural considerations) in settings where applications of psychology and/or psychological research occur.

Career-related Skills:

  1. Knowledge of different career areas that are appropriate for psychology majors.
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of professional options and required training for careers in the major subfields of psychology.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to identify personally-relevant career options to implement their psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.

Academic Advising

The objectives of the university’s academic advising program are to help advisees identify and achieve their academic goals, to promote their intellectual discovery, and to encourage students to take advantage of both in-and out-of class educational opportunities in order that they become self-directed learners and decision makers.

Both advisers and advisees share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed. By encouraging their advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning, advisers assume a significant educational role. The advisee’s unit of enrollment will provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser, the information needed to plan the chosen program of study, and referrals to other specialized resources.

READ SENATE POLICY 32-00: ADVISING POLICY

Harrisburg

Cobi Michael, Ph.D.
Program Coordinator
Olmsted Building, W311
Middletown, PA 17057
717-948-6036
cmk292@psu.edu

Suggested Academic Plan

The suggested academic plan(s) listed on this page are the plan(s) that are in effect during the 2020-21 academic year. To access previous years' suggested academic plans, please visit the archive to view the appropriate Undergraduate Bulletin edition (Note: the archive only contain suggested academic plans beginning with the 2018-19 edition of the Undergraduate Bulletin).

Psychology, B.S. at Harrisburg Campus

The course series listed below provides only one of the many possible ways to move through this curriculum. The University may make changes in policies, procedures, educational offerings, and requirements at any time. This plan should be used in conjunction with your degree audit (accessible in LionPATH as either an Academic Requirements or What If report). Please consult with a Penn State academic adviser on a regular basis to develop and refine an academic plan that is appropriate for you.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ENGL 15 or 30H3CAS 1003
Quantification (GQ)3Quantification (GQ)3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
PSYCH 100*3General Education Course3
General Education Course (GHW)1.5BIOL 141 or BISC 4*†3
 13.5 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
General Education Course3ENGL 202A3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
General Education Course3General Education Course3
PSYCH 200 or STAT 200 (PSYCH 200 recommended)*4PSYCH 301W*4
PSYCH 221 or PSYCH 420; PSYCH 238 or PSYCH 438; PSYCH 243, PSYCH 471, or PSYCH 441*3PSYCH 212, 410, 412, or 416*3
 16 16
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PSYCH 212, 410, 412, or 416*3General Education Course (GHW)1.5
PSYCH 270 or PSYCH 470; PSYCH 443, PSYCH 476, PSYCH 370, or PSYCH 473*3PSYCH 221 or PSYCH 420; PSYCH 238 or PSYCH 438; PSYCH 471 or PSYCH 441*3
PSYCH 260 or PSYCH 462; PSYCH 261 or PSYCH 461; PSYCH 256, PSYCH 452 or PSYCH 456*3PSYCH 270 or PSYCH 470; PSYCH 443, PSYCH 476, PSYCH 370 or PSYCH 473 *3
Select from supporting list #1 (See Program Notes)3PSYCH 260 or PSYCH 462; PSYCH 261 or PSYCH 461; PSYCH 256, PSYCH 452, or PSYCH 456*3
Select from supporting list #2 (See Program Notes)3Select from supporting list #2 (See Program Notes)3
 15 13.5
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PSYCH 395 or 494*3Select any PSYCH courses not used above*6
Select any PSYCH courses not used above*6Select from supporting list #1 (See Program Notes)3
Select from supporting list #2 (See Program Notes)3Select from supporting list #2 (See Program Notes)3
Elective3Elective3
 Elective3
 15 18
Total Credits 122

University Requirements and General Education Notes:

US and IL are abbreviations used to designate courses that satisfy University Requirements (United States and International Cultures).

W, M, X, and Y are the suffixes at the end of a course number used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

GWS, GQ, GHW, GN, GA, GH, and GS are abbreviations used to identify General Education program courses. General Education includes Foundations (GWS and GQ) and Knowledge Domains (GHW, GN, GA, GH, GS, and Integrative Studies). Foundations courses (GWS and GQ) require a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Integrative Studies courses are required for the General Education program. N is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate an Inter-Domain course and Z is the suffix at the end of a course number used to designate a Linked course.

Advising Notes

  • GWS, GQ, GA, GH, GS, GN and GHW are codes used to identify General Education requirements.
  • US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States/International Cultures requirements. All students are required to take one IL and one US course before graduation. A course designated as US;IL may be used as a US or an IL, not both.
  • W suffix signifies the course satisfies the University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.

Program Notes

  • Students must complete a 3-credit course in “United States Cultures (US)” and a 3-credit course in “International Cultures (IL).”
  • At least 15 credits from supporting list courses must be at the 400 level.

Supporting Course List #1 (select 6 credits)

  • AAA S, AM ST, ARAB, ART, ART H, BRASS, C ART, C HIS, CAMS, CAS, CHNS, CMLIT, COMM, COMMS, DANCE, ENGL, FR, GER, GREEK, HEBR, HIST, HUM, I HUM, INART, IT, J ST, JAPNS, KOR, LATIN, LING, LIT, MEDVL, MUSIC, PHIL, PORT, RL ST, RUS, SP ST, SPAN, STS, THEA, THTRE
  • WMNST 101 - African American Women (GH;US) (3)
  • WMNST 102 - Women of Color: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (GH;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 104 - Women and the American Experience (GH;US) (3)
  • WMNST 117 - Women in Modern History (GH;US;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 137 - Women and Religion (GH;US;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 194 - Women Writers (GH;US;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 205 - Women, Minorities, and Media (US) (3)
  • WMNST 270 - Race and Gender in Literature Translated from French (3)
  • WMNST 407W - Women and Theatre (US) (3)
  • WMNST 438 - Feminist Philosophy (3)
  • WMNST 455 - Gender Roles in Communication (US) (3)
  • WMNST 462 - Reading Black, Reading Feminist (US) (3)
  • WMNST 466 - Lesbian and Gay History (US;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 490 - Women Writers and Their Worlds (US;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 430 - Women in Politics in the U.S. (US) (3)
  • WMNST 489 - British Women Writers (3)
  • WMNST 491 - American Women Writers (3)

Supporting Course List #2 (select 12 credits)

  • ADM J, AAA S, AFRAS, ANTH, BE SC (except BE SC 302), CRIMJ, ECON, HCM, HD FS, PLSC, PUBPL, R SOC, SCLSC, SO SC, SOC
  • WMNST 1 - (GS;US) (3)
  • WMNST 103 - Racism and Sexism (US) (3)
  • WMNST 110 - Sociology of Gender (GS;US) (3)
  • WMNST 116 - Family and Sex Roles in Modern History (GS;US;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 136 - Race, Gender, and Employment (US) (3)
  • WMNST 202N - Gender Dynamics in Africa (GS;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 250 - Sexual Identity over the Life Span (US) (3)
  • WMNST 423 - Sexual and Domestic Violence (US) (3)
  • WMNST 424 - Women and Sport (US) (3)
  • WMNST 428 - Gender and Politics (US;IL) (3)
  • WMNST 452 - Women's Health Issues (US) (3)
  • WMNST 453 - Women and the Criminal Justice System (US) (3)
  • WMNST 456 - Gender, Occupations, and Professions (3)
  • WMNST 471 - The Psychology of Gender (US) (3)
  • WMNST 476W - Anthropology of Gender (3)
  • WMNST 464 - Feminine and Masculine (US) (3)

Career Paths

The American Psychological Association’s Center for Workforce Studies reported in 2013, that 94% of people holding bachelor’s degrees in psychology are employed. According to projections by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, most bachelor's-level Psychology graduates will move toward positions in human services, where an increase of 13 percent in job growth is expected in some areas. Other employment fields for psychology graduates, including entry-level management, human resources, and sales, anticipate growth between 5 and 7 percent.

Careers

Penn State Harrisburg’s B.S. in Psychology degree provides students with a variety of skills that are exceptionally valued in the mental health and social services fields, basic and applied research, applied behavior, human resources, social work, medicine, business, law, and careers in local, state, and federal government.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT POTENTIAL CAREER OPTIONS FOR GRADUATES OF THE PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM

Opportunities for Graduate Studies

The Psychology program also provides a strong background for graduate education, including Penn State's Master of Arts programs in Applied Behavior Analysis or Applied Clinical Psychology. The Master of Arts degree in Applied Clinical Psychology includes optional preparation for the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) credential.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDIES

Professional Resources

Contact

Harrisburg

SCHOOL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES AND EDUCATION
Olmsted Building, W311
Middletown, PA 17057
717-948-6034
sar6088@psu.edu

https://harrisburg.psu.edu/behavioral-sciences-and-education/social-sciences-and-psychology/bachelor-science-psychology